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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I believe this is a 1905 model? Forgive me if I’m off on that. It’s a 38 special hand ejector but with no loop on the bottom. A six digit serial number in the center off the butt so no loop ever existed. Serial is 295070. The number on the cylinder hinge is 6424.

It looks daily clean, and I cleaned the bore and cylinders. It was my fathers who collected a few firearms. I am posting pictures.

I am curious if the date of the revolver, if it safe for modern loads, and if there is any value to it. Also, what grade would consider this? Based on the pics of course. Not interested in selling, just curious.
 

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What you have is a fairly early .38 Military & Police 4th change. these were manufactured from 1915 - 1942. The lack od the "made in USA" stamp on the right side of the frame and the mushroom shaped ejector rod knob would place your gun before the 20s I believe. The elimination of the S&W logo on the gun was only done for a very short span.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Fascinating. I did not expect such fast responses but truly appreciate them. Since there is no loop at the bottom, would that mean this was intended as a civilian model?
 

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Heat treating of cylinders didn't begin until the 316XXX range so stick with lead 148 or 158gr loads. Cowboy loads will probably be the nicest to shoot. In the condition show it would be around a $400 gun at a show. Of course it's value to you is much greater. Carefully remove the grips and look for the serial number of the gun penciled on the right stock. I'm thinking those grips are later than your gun. The silver medallion stock began in 1929. Your gun most likely shipped in 1918 as most of the 275XXX range shipped in 1917.
 

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They are very nice shooters. I have this one from 1917 and is 1905 4th change. Got it for 225.00 as some "character marks" and is a very nice shooter. In my area would say it would be 200-225.
thumbnai1l.jpg
 

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Welcome to the forum!

I have a Model of 1902, also in .38 Special, and it shoots 158-grain lead round nose rounds just fine. Modern commercial LRN rounds are actually loaded less stoutly than the rounds of the day were. Even lighter loads are for Cowboy Action Shooting. Either ones should be fine - the condition of the gun per pictures (excellent pictures by the way), suggests it'd be fine to shoot.

Not sure as to value - the grips alone might be worth a couple hundred as they appear to be in good shape. If they are numbered to your gun, then that raises the value of the gun. Finish condition is definitely middling. I'd hazard $300 for the gun as is assuming the grips number to it.
 
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Original grips would have gold medallions. The grips are from the mid 30s.
Here's one from 1918 with original grips.
cYx8iW6.jpg
 

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Welcome to the forum!
 

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..... Since there is no loop at the bottom, would that mean this was intended as a civilian model?
There were no military-specific models of the M&P between a few very limited batches of the Models 1899 and 1902 at the beginning of the century and then the British Service and US service models starting in 1940. Those came with lanyard loops.

But swivels were also always available on special order, and were ordered by some agencies and police departments. On the other hand, any revolver without a swivel can also have been a service gun. If there are no agency markings, which yours doesn’t have, only a history letter might reveal that.
 
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