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I have two Winchester Model 94's in 30-30 (lever action).

I got an old Winchester Model 74 23" br in .22LR for Christmas.

Does anyone here that know the Model 74? I have no clue but will break it down and clean it to see what is going on.
Mod74.JPG Mod74a.JPG Mod74b.JPG Mod74c.JPG
 

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Rodney,
I have no clue where I am going here. I got it today. :D

I think the old ammo boxes are very cool. They are not in good condition.
 

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Rodney,
I have no clue where I am going here. I got it today. :D

I think the old ammo boxes are very cool. They are not in good condition.
I sent some links and looks like will be very easy to disassemble like my Mossbergs or Savage 22s.
 

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Rodney,
A guy on ODT said the rifle was made in 1942. I was thinking the 1950's?

I did a complete refresh today. The cool thing about the Model 74 is the bolt action is easy to remove. I cleaned it up with an old tooth brush with gun oil. I ran some cotton down the barrel (three times) with no visible problems.

I like the old guns.
 

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Try the Winchester section of this forum.
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/
Thanks,
I couldn't log in to join. :D

They had 5 pictures linking to slow loading links. I finally just gave up. :confused: It was a very confusing procedure.

I finally found a link to the old owner's manual. Great gun. Do you guys remember the ammo loading rod that went from the butt of the gun up to loader/ejector? That was a unique thing. The Winnie 74 was first released in 1940.
 
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Wow, nice old 74! Love the wood/grain on the older rifles, More TLC during the manufacturing. Simple with character. Congrats and hopefully will be seeing a range report soon.:cool:
 

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Good old .22 . Years ago (many actually) my best friend had one and I used my Remington 550-1. We had a lot of fun plinking away and going after squirrels. My memory is that the 74 shot well and his was old enough it did not have a grooved receiver.
 

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My grandfather had one of these made in 1940, per the serial. I believe the 74 may have stated production in 1939, but only in .22 short initially. My grandfather was gone by the time I was born, so it was neat to find it in quite good condition. We were able to have the gun at my childhood home a couple of times over the years, but due to the request of my mother's only brother (he was only 16 at the time of his dad's passing), the 74 is again stashed in a closet for the foreseeable future. However, recently I found a few on gunbroker, and picked up a 1948 vintage one for about $100 less than what I was seeing the few at gun shows for. I had forgotten how much fun they are to shoot. Easy to clean, easy to load, and feed impressively well for their age.
 

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My grandfather had one of these made in 1940, per the serial. I believe the 74 may have stated production in 1939, but only in .22 short initially...
The book says 1940 for all guns. [Your memory is better than a book].

The book does say that a .22 short is worth a 25% premium over the .22LR. That would be due to the rarity of the gun. I get that.

I am much more of a shooter than likes the gun over the rarity value.
 

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Thanks Rodney,
That is a cool site. It also said that it was made in 1942. Does anyone know why the bullet entry is in the side of the right stock (see p.1 pics 1&2)? It's just for show since the tube that runs from the stock butt to the loading at the firing bolt is solid (good luck ramming a bullet in there).

I have a Winchester Model 94 in 30-30 20" that I bought in the 1970's to hunt deer (I scared a few back in the day :) ). That site didn't show Model 94 or the Model of 1894 (it was made from 1894–2006). I guess they haven't cataloged those (7.5M made)?

I need to get the old feller (the gun not me) to a range and shoot it. :D
 

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I don't know anything about the Model 74,but that's some nice wood!:cool:
 
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I don't know anything about the Model 74,but that's some nice wood!:cool:
I fully agree. I also think most American manufactures did excellent work on wood stocks for many decades following WW2.

IMO, the last few years have been a big disappointment on the wood (most is not wood).
 
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