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Discussion Starter #1
I'm interested in obtaining a current production Winchester Model 70 in .30-06 (sometime after the current troubles that is), so I've been trying to do research beforehand. However, I feel like I get a lot of conflicting or confused information when I try to go in depth on particular aspects of the rifle. Does anyone have any advice for in-depth reading material for the Winchester Model 70? I've found a couple of articles, but I'm not finding what I'm looking for.

One thing I'm trying to figure out in what form this rifle would be good for a rifle that will be used for hunting, but also a comfortable gun for shooting from a bench for an extended time for recreational paper target shooting. I've been seeing things about heavy barrels and different stocks, but I've been getting confused by what I've seen up to this point. When you look at all the versions offered by Winchester right now, I don't know which one is best for what I want to do with it. I feel like my confusion is due to ignorance on my part (my experience comes only from shooting revolvers, pistol-caliber carbines/rifles, and the M1 Garand), which is why I'm asking for reading material (or whatever advice anyone has to offer). I'm asking on this forum since it's the only firearms forum I'm a member of and have had good responses here thus far.
 

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I have two model 70 Winchesters plus a Super Grade I gave my son for Christmas. I previously owned another. The two I now own is a Featherweight in 7x57 Mauser and a Sporter in 300 Winchester Magnum.

For your described uses, I would recommend the Sporter. It will make a great hunting rifle and the little extra weight will be more comfortable shooting off the bench.

In my opinion, the Model 70 is a great rifle and smooth feeding. Not something you find nowadays in the modern plastic rifles. I will say concerning the current crop of some rifles, they are hard to beat for accuracy. But the Model 70 is a classic.

The 30-06 is a great choice.

Joe A.
 

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IMNVHO all Model 70's are great rifles & .30-06 a very versatile round. Personally I prefer light rifles, since they get carried a lot more miles than they're shot & I'm big & heavy enough recoil doesn't hurt that much (the .308 Mauser I built for myself is only 5 3/4lbs.). Lighter rifles are nicer if you do a lot of hiking while hunting while heavier rifles are better @ absorbing recoil from repeat shots @ the range (we usually fire a lot more rounds practicing than @ game). If your hunting style is more sitting & glassing or in a tree stand weight isn't a big issue. Where you hunt is a big factor - back east long range glassing, hiking & shooting doesn't happen like it does here in the west so heavier guns are ok. Of course here if you're going to pack in somewhere & the horse is carrying it a heavy gun isn't so bad. Hope this helps.
 

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I've own and hunted with Winchesters Model 70s for fifty years.....Mostly pre-64s.

The Sporter weight rifles are a-okay....But, as I've gotten older, I prefer the lighter versions.

My latest Model 70 purchase is the current offering in stainless as a feather weight.
In as much as I like to 30-06 as an all round cartridge, I chose what would have been
called in the old days the 'Western' the 264 magnum, since I handload, I can load it up or down.

It shoots as good as any Winchester I've own before....I'm good to go.





Also, the current 'Alaskan' model chambered in 30-06 would be a good choice, I'd think as well.



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My pre-64 'Westerner-Alaskan' 300 Win.Mag. Of course I load it up or down as needed.

Fancy triple A grade walnut I stocked it with back in the early 80s.



.
 

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I would opt for the Winchester Safari Grade (express) in 30-06 in a pre 64. I would get it with iron sights but you can put a scope on it as well. Iron sights are a good backup if something happens to the scope.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for the great advice. As previously mentioned, for me, hunting would be a stand of some kind so a heavy model 70 would not be as significant an issue. I am really getting the idea that my instinct of going with a heavier model may have been correct. Then again, longer and heavier has frequently been my instinct due to my first experience with a rifle was an old muzzleloading Enfield rifled musket.

So, for an off-the-rack model, Sporter or Alaskan seem to be the top two choices. But I still wonder about obtaining and paying for someone to install a heavier "target" barrel (that's the term I've seen used) an appropriate stock. I wonder about it, but I have no clue how one would even start with something like that.
 

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The advantage of a target barrel is they're made to tighter specs. Heavier is sometimes more accurate because they're stiffer. Fluted barrels do the same thing but cut the weight. Fatter barrels require the stock to be carved out so the wood & barrel don't touch (free floated)... or go w/ a custom stock. There are a few custom gun builders around who'll re-barrel a rifle for you, depends on where you are, the only one I know personally anymore is in AZ. I built a bunch of custom rifles when I was in the gunsmithing business (nope, not looking for a job - I'm retired).
 

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There is a model 70 XTR in 30-06 on midwestguntrader.com right now that dates to 1975. The pics look good and the it comes with scope and mounts. I have no dog in this fight, just noticed it this afternoon. Gun is located in KCMO area.
If we're giving advice, I would find an old model 70 featherweight in .270 and never look back. One man's opinion.
 

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I have the classic M70 in '03-06, stock and bluing are very well engineered and it rests comfortably on the shoulder. It's a versatile caliber to load for and bullet selection is abundant. As I age, 200gr Sierras are a bit on the punishing side if wearing light clothing. The action is particularly smooth as the bolt cycles, much like a well used 98 Mauser; it's a smile inducing experience. :)
 
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