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I have several snubbys, from 3" to under 2" barrels, and in calibers .22lr, 38sp, 357, 9mm and 44sp, and I love them all. They look good, they feel good to carry, they are fun to shoot, they are simple and reliable. They are an expert's weapon to be used to their full potential but also a beginner's weapon to be used to a practical level. I have the 357 for the versatility as there are times (like recently, for example) when ammo is scarce and maybe you can find 38 but not 357, or maybe you can find 357 but not 38. I would probably just settle for 38 if I were only going to own one.
 

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Mainly for concealment purposes, they created snubby revolvers, but also to make for a faster draw, in a life/death situation, where an extra second, could prove deadly! A shorter barrel clears a holster slightly faster, when you need it. Especally if under a coat.

You have to deal with increased recoil, and shorter sight radius, but it can be brought into action quicker, a very desirable feature. Using a Magnum snubby allows you to have a more powerful sidearm , when you need it.

You need to practice a lot more to become competent with a snubby. Your life depends on your abilities with your gun.

I like my Ruger LC9s, with a 3.1" barrel, and it's the same size as my Smith M-36 2". It also has a SA trigger for every shot, making it better (in my opinion). Basically, it lighter by 3 ozs., has a lighter, better trigger, and has 8 shots of 9mm. ammo! That's pretty hard to beat!!!! ;) Bob
 

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Yeah Model 19 snubbies are the best IMO
1A13.jpg
 

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Wanted to first start off and say that I have absolutely ZERO!!! hands on experience with revolvers of any kind and frame, but am doing a little bit of looking around and tons of research on them as I plan on looking into purchasing my first sometime in the near future. I've always had a liking for the short barreled, large frame revolvers that fall under the "snub-nosed" category, but after hours of looking into it and countless people talking about how useless it really is..

Why are .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum and even LARGER being made into snub configurations if you lose so much potential velocity of what a Magnum cartridge is?
I can understand that lots of people would want a nice big cartridge like that as compared to 9mm, .40, .38 spl because it is larger, but also to be carried easier, hence the shorter barrel for concealment, but what is the actual purpose besides just being chambered in a larger caliber that actually brings a downfall to the user because of the shorter barrel giving less than ideal muzzle velocity?

I was particularly interested in both the S&W M66 and M69 in .357 Mag and .44 Mag respectively, and noticed that not only did they have 4.25" barrels but an additional configuration of 2 and 3/4" inch barrels.
But how much are you really losing in terms of numbers in ft/s when comparing a 2.75" barrel to say a 4.25" or 6" barrel and even higher?
And would it constitute these larger caliber revolvers place to be carried or even owned if they supposedly can't live up to the Magnum status as they claim it?

Like I said, no hands on experience or any personal testing done myself, only fired semi-autos in typical 9mm, etc. Mostly a bolt gun guy. Am I stupid?

They really are pretty pistols, if anything I just want one to own one.. screw it.
Wanted to first start off and say that I have absolutely ZERO!!! hands on experience with revolvers of any kind and frame, but am doing a little bit of looking around and tons of research on them as I plan on looking into purchasing my first sometime in the near future. I've always had a liking for the short barreled, large frame revolvers that fall under the "snub-nosed" category, but after hours of looking into it and countless people talking about how useless it really is..

Why are .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum and even LARGER being made into snub configurations if you lose so much potential velocity of what a Magnum cartridge is?
I can understand that lots of people would want a nice big cartridge like that as compared to 9mm, .40, .38 spl because it is larger, but also to be carried easier, hence the shorter barrel for concealment, but what is the actual purpose besides just being chambered in a larger caliber that actually brings a downfall to the user because of the shorter barrel giving less than ideal muzzle velocity?

I was particularly interested in both the S&W M66 and M69 in .357 Mag and .44 Mag respectively, and noticed that not only did they have 4.25" barrels but an additional configuration of 2 and 3/4" inch barrels.
But how much are you really losing in terms of numbers in ft/s when comparing a 2.75" barrel to say a 4.25" or 6" barrel and even higher?
And would it constitute these larger caliber revolvers place to be carried or even owned if they supposedly can't live up to the Magnum status as they claim it?

Like I said, no hands on experience or any personal testing done myself, only fired semi-autos in typical 9mm, etc. Mostly a bolt gun guy. Am I stupid?

They really are pretty pistols, if anything I just want one to own one.. screw it.

Simple answer is because they can, and there is a market mate, similarly why would you buy an X frame, or a 10 cylinder? Because we can...God bless America..

Thewelshm
 

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My snubby 640 Pro is loaded with +P .38s in spite of .357 magnum chambering. The short barrel is comfortable and concealable for all day everyday carry. The added weight of all steel construction further limits recoil and makes follow up shots quicker. Every defensive handgun trainer I've worked with agrees that after shot placement, recoil management is most important because multiple hits are effective. Modern bullet designs make the .38 a far more effective load than it was once considered.

90% of the magnums handgun ammo I shoot these days are reloads at around 1000 fps. I'm not recoil sensitive, but I outgrew recoil for it's own sake decades ago.
 

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I am another fan of the 3" barrel .357 Magnum and have these three:



Model 60 and Model 686 plus.



Ruger SP101.

I agree with the above comments on pluses, especially concealment. Another bonus is that you have 2 caliber choices and with .38 Special is not any load in that caliber that will not work, plus there are many sub full power loads for .357 Magnum that lack the more punishing recoil of full power loads. I favor the Remington Golden Saber loads in calibers and in .357 it is quite a good load. Most of the ballistics I have seen put the 125 grain bullet at just under 1200 FPS.
 

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I should add that I have (or rather, had) a Model 60 in .357 and a Model 686 in .357 - both snubbies - however, I only shot .38 specials through them. But they could have been used for hand punishment purposes.
 

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Big fan of magnum snubs. I think the question in the original post has been answered. They are getting hard to find at reasonable prices. I hade to make my own. This one started life as a 4" square butt model 19-6.
Very well done!!
 

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I still just feel like it is a matter of personal preference. I carry the S&W Model 69 Combat .44 mag in a Safari Shoulder rig for a right hand crossdraw. I also will carry either my Sig .40 or Tisas .45 acp in a leather right hip holster. I love my Sig .40 but have to admit that for me personally I am more accurate at the range with my S&W .44 with a 4.25" barrel, the slightly added barrel weight allows me to get back on target faster and helps with recoil. I do have a snub nose .357 that I planned to pocket carry but haven't been able to get to the range yet to see how it fires...but due to my love for my .44 I am looking at the S&W 686 Plus Double-Action Revolver - 4'' Barrel .357 as my next acquisition.
 

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Ya see it's like this, with a 6" barrel , ya got to hit them with the bullet to have any effect.
But with a snub-nose, the muzzle blast from a magnum cartridge will practically kill anything around it !!!
That's why you need one, or two, or ten maybe !!!!!
Now if you want some self inflicted (to the one firing the gun) pain to go along with that muzzle blast, get yourself
one of those S&W 340PD, 11.8 oz. scandium J frame .357 jobs and you'll have it all, it's a beast no matter which end of the gun you're standing on!!!
 

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Why are .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum and even LARGER being made into snub configurations if you lose so much potential velocity of what a Magnum cartridge is?
Because a .357 magnum or a .44 magnum (or larger) out of a 3 inch barrel is going to have more velocity than a .38 special or .44 special out of the same 3 inch barrel. And a longer barrel does not lend itself to concealability. If you want to shoot the gun a lot, a steady diet of .38 special or .44 special won't hurt the gun much if at all. Just make sure you clean out any carbon rings that build up or subsequent .357 magnum or a .44 magnum cases may have trouble cambering or extracting.

I have a snub nose 629. It's a blast. Literally. Vortex ring of fire and all. If I was running around in the back country and didn't want to open carry some heavy 8+ inch X-frame, the 629 would be my go-to. I have a snub nose 640. It's also a blast. I don't shoot full power loads though either of them much at all. I shoot a lot of light handloads that are comparable to .38 special or .44 special loads but in longer .357 magnum or a .44 magnum cases to avoid carbon ring build up where a magnum length case would go (not that I ever go that long between cleanings for it to become an issue, but whatever.)

Snub nose revolvers are meant to be carried a lot while hidden and not shot a whole lot at full power. Sure there are some folks out there who love the blast but that group is small in number.
 

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Wanted to first start off and say that I have absolutely ZERO!!! hands on experience with revolvers of any kind and frame, but am doing a little bit of looking around and tons of research on them as I plan on looking into purchasing my first sometime in the near future. I've always had a liking for the short barreled, large frame revolvers that fall under the "snub-nosed" category, but after hours of looking into it and countless people talking about how useless it really is..

Why are .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum and even LARGER being made into snub configurations if you lose so much potential velocity of what a Magnum cartridge is?
I can understand that lots of people would want a nice big cartridge like that as compared to 9mm, .40, .38 spl because it is larger, but also to be carried easier, hence the shorter barrel for concealment, but what is the actual purpose besides just being chambered in a larger caliber that actually brings a downfall to the user because of the shorter barrel giving less than ideal muzzle velocity?

I was particularly interested in both the S&W M66 and M69 in .357 Mag and .44 Mag respectively, and noticed that not only did they have 4.25" barrels but an additional configuration of 2 and 3/4" inch barrels.
But how much are you really losing in terms of numbers in ft/s when comparing a 2.75" barrel to say a 4.25" or 6" barrel and even higher?
And would it constitute these larger caliber revolvers place to be carried or even owned if they supposedly can't live up to the Magnum status as they claim it?

Like I said, no hands on experience or any personal testing done myself, only fired semi-autos in typical 9mm, etc. Mostly a bolt gun guy. Am I stupid?

They really are pretty pistols, if anything I just want one to own one.. screw it.
Hello, first off I am in my 70’s and have hunted deer for over 40 years with 44,454 and 460 revolvers with great success. I also carry a revolver pocket concealed most of the time. My fav is the Smith 351C in .22 magnum. Then the Smith 340 which is also hammerless 11oz and 12oz respectively, super nice and the 351C is hammerless as well. I also have a Smith 329 Night Guard 44 Magnum, 2 3/4” barrel, 29oz in a holster when weather and clothing allows. You are absolutely correct they lose quite a bit of power in the short configuration. However it is a 44 bullet it really does not need to expand, it is much bigger just coming out of the barrel than most other calibers. I WOULD NOT WANT TO GET HIT BY A 44 No matter what barrel length. I have a few semis I carry, my two fav’s, my Kahr PM40 in 40 S&W. Because of power and light weight. Another one I really like is my Para LDA 3” 45 ACP. But it’s drawback for me is the weight. I am or at least mostly a BIG BORE FAN. Have fun looking, the revolvers are a great carry firearm. And they most always go bang when you pull the trigger.
 

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In 1978 I bought a S&W Model 19 with (I think) a 3" barrel. After I had to use to put down a rabid dog with 1 shot there were no more snarky comments. I rue the day I sold that gun. I now have S&W revolvers on stand-by just in case.
 

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I have several snubbies in 357 and one in 44 mag. the model 69. You can get much more out of them if you hand load. For the 44 I load 185gr SWC-HP at 950 FPS because that’s exactly where I want them to be. That should make a great CCW round that doesnt over penetrate and has great stopping power. I also load some heavier 240gr if I want more power for 4 legged critters.
 
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