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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I ran across a used 2-inch K-frame Smith at my local shop and the price is pretty attractive. It looks like a Model 10 but the price tag says, "S&W 50.50" and it does say 50.50 inside the crane. It also has British BNP proof marks on the bottom of the barrel. The right side of the frame says "Made in the U.S.A." I'm not having much luck tracking info down on Google; what the heck is this thing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Okay, after some lengthy digging I discovered it's probably a Victory that's been cut down to two inches. The proof marks and full-length ejector rod support this. What are the odds (assuming it's been rebored for .38 Special) that it would handle regular amounts of modern defensive ammo?
 

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Hi infrared35,
Welcome to the forum.
S&W did not start marking Model numbers until 1957. Thus there are some 2.5 million M&P Revolvers out there that are not model 10s. This is also the date that S&W also says that it is ok to use +p rounds in K frame guns. Therefore if it is not Model Marked S&W does not think that +p ammo should be used. The missing latch under the barrel makes the gun less than it should be. the 50.50 in the crane is only an assembly number. The serial number is on the butt and may be under the barrel above the ejector rod and on the face of the cylinder. Is the cylinder bored out for 38 Special? There are 3 ways that it was done. 1. A new .38 Special cylinder was installed. (best) 2. the existing 38 S&W chambers were bored out and sleeves were installed and chambered for .38 special (not quite as good.) 3. The existing 38 S&W chambers were simply bored deeper leaving a stepped chamber that is very loose the rearward 3/4" back end of the chamber. The British supposedly proof tested these cylinders before they were imported back into the USA. But that was over50 years ago. If the rechamber was done the third way you can use .38 S&W ammo just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the quick reply! Is there any way to tell which method of rechambering has been used? Are there certain markings on a factory .38 Special cylinder, etc.?
 

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It is possible that the gun was originally .38 Special even the vast majority of guns sent to the British Commonwealth were .38 S&W. If it is the .38 S&W that has been rebored to .38 special you should have an easily identifable chamber with a larger diameter hole for the first 3/4" deep then a slight ly smaller diameter for the next 3/8" and a little smaller hole for the rest of the chamber. 3 different diameters, You should easily see this stepped chamber. A .38 S&W will fit this type of chamber and I would recommend only using . 38 S&W in these chambers.
.38 S&W chambers are only about 3/4" deep, while .38 Special are almost 1 1/8" deep.
The rear face of the cylinder should have a serial number that originally matched the serial number on the bottom of the butt. A changed cylinder would be identifable if the numbers did not match, If the cylinder had the chambers sleeved it may be easy to see or if it were done very well it may be hard to determine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
All right, looks like I've got the three-step chamber. .38 Special dummy rounds chamber just fine but some random reloads I tried were a little tight. Factory ammo seems to fit okay. Guess I'll run it with low-velocity Federal wadcutters until I can replace the cylinder...
 
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