Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Good night to all, I received this revolver whitewash. 32 of inheritance and he/she would like to know the model and possible year of production.
The about 20 years ago were changed the trigger and the dog.
It does not possess marks S & W in any to tie to not to be in the grips other point is the series number that the last three that are almost extinguished:



























I distrust that this weapon was repainted, therefore escrições exist in the pipe but very weak:

DOES THAT ARE BEST HIT
REVOLVER PAT MAY 4 ... APRIL 12 .. 188

I thank the help of all premature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,218 Posts
Hi luiz,
A warm welcome to the forum. welcome01 I would say that your .32 revolver is a spanish copy of a Smith & Wesson and was probably made in Spain either in the 1920's or early 1930's. It is definately not a S&W.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Luiz, I agree with Jim. This is not a Smith & Wesson revolver, but the manufacturer had a S&W in mind when he designed it. The closest S&W revolver is the .32 Hand Ejector, which was made in a variety of very similar models from 1896 until 1940. After World War 2, the design was changed by the company. Jim is probably correct that this one was manufactured before 1940. But regardless of when it was made, it was patterned on a S&W of the pre-war era.

To my eyes, the most obvious design differences between this gun and a real S&W involve the way the mainspring is anchored in the gun's frame and the length and angle of the mainspring tension screw. There are also subtle differences in part profiles, such as the line of the sideplate in the vicinity of the rear sideplate screw.

Of course there is the obvious situation that there are no S&W markings anywhere on the metal of the gun. But any markings may have been removed in a previous refinishing of the steel. Note that the edges of the sideplate are rounded over. That is an indicator of refinishing. Also, you would expect to see rounded hammer stud and pin ends on the left side of the frame. Instead, they are polished flat.

So I do not believe it is an authentic Smith & Wesson, but some European copies were good revolvers in their own right. I believe you have one of those.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top