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Discussion Starter #1
So this is a real general question that’s been on my mind a little. I’m new to S&W revolvers but I’ve owned a number of different guns and none of them have caught on with me in the same way as these have. I liked a few a lot like an hk45, a couple 1911s but I always ended up selling them for the next bright shiny thing. But I really want to hang onto my S&Ws. I’m 31 so it’s not a nostalgic thing for me, although I do like the history of them and the old school cool factor. I don’t know enough about em to pop them open and work on them like I can with a 1911 or other autoloaders but honestly I don’t feel like they really need upgrades or tinkering. I’m perfectly happy with them as they came. I love the mechanics of them and how at the same time they’re simple and complex. Aesthetically a lot of them are very similar but that doesn’t stop me from wanting different dash 19s or a bunch of N frames in different calibers. I can’t put my finger on why they’re so cool to me but I love the ones I have and can’t wait to build my collection. So I was curious what makes them special to other members or what got them interested in these revolvers?
 

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Growing up the Smith was the epitome of what a gun should look like, Colt had it too.

Thewelshm
 

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Back when I started in LE, I couldn't afford a Python so I settled for S&Ws. I got to where I liked S&Ws just fine, in fact better than Colt's. 50 years later, I still can't afford or won't pay the price for Colt's..
 

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I shoot them better. That's what got me into S&W.
Colt, Ruger etc just feel weird.
For me ,after Smiths, CZ feels the most natural.
 

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What’s not to like ... LOL

I mostly have vintage S&Ws. For me it’s the quality, style and feel.
 

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GREAT question!

I have always loved revolvers period but .. there is something... especially about the prelocks that is special. The little details, sexy lines, its brutish but handsome. I also love the short trigger pull and the large easy to work on parts. Its a fairly simple machine which really appeals to me.

I have and have had several Ruger revolvers. Great guns and I would bank and do bank my life on them and shot them very well .. having said that .. they are more functional horses to me where the Smith has personality.

The Harley analogy is kind of on point. I have owned a few and while they arent my favorite motorcycle for a variety of reasons ... there is still something freakin magical about riding one that the Japanese cruisers could never capture.
 

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I have a very mechanical mind. For me just looking at one is like looking at art. The proportions are so perfect that the gun can be scaled up or down and still look just right. Once you get past the looks there's the immense level of skill and craftsmanship necessary to build such a fine product. Not to discount the more modern guns but this is especially true of the more vintage pieces. I really appreciate the pride these workers obviously had in their product. On top of all this they are just gangs of fun to shoot and usually increase in value during ownership. It's quite the experience.
 

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Sometimes a masterpiece evolves over years of engineering refinement. The action of the Smith and Wesson hand ejector revolver has been constantly improved for 121 years, starting with the 1899 S&W M&P Hand Ejector.

Unfortunately, a fine revolver requires gunsmiths with the skill to manufacture them. Quality control helps manage this, but the S&W revolver has varied over the years. Thankfully their customer service has always been there to deal with the problems.

Other designs (like the M1911a1) have also evolved over the years, but perhaps none as much as the number of variations in the basic S&W revolver design. For that reason, there are a large number of choices in S&W revolvers in frame size, ammunition, and design (full lug / half lug / no lug; square butt, round butt; sights; etc.)

When I bought my first S&W revolver, the quality and design were what attracted me. That and the outstanding action (which had been tuned by a skilled gunsmith on my first S&W 586).

I guess, based on the refinements and choices, the S&W revolvers I own are just "right".
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I appreciate all the responses! I identify with a lot of these reasons. I was talking to another guy about my age about this and I told him the smiths have personality and cache. Glocks are fine but they’re just a totally different animal, they will never have the personality of a cool old school smith. I like that they’re affordable enough that I can afford most of what I consider higher end collectors models (I had just started a nice little collection before the corona virus and I can’t wait for it to end so I can get back to building it). I can get 2 or 3 of the best smiths ever made (model 27s, 29s, 19s etc etc) for the price of one Colt python, and I could still get parts or have it repaired if I needed to. At the same time there’s a lot of cool models around 500 or under. 10s, 13s, 15s, J frames and really just so many options. They all just caught on in a big way with me.
 

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My father had an ruger blackhawk in 44mag, thought it was the coolest gun and so much fun to shoot. Then around 15 years later my father in law past away and left me some of his Smith's. I was hooked one was the oh so coveted Model-27 with 5in barrel. What can say I started shooting it; suddenly almost all my autos were sold and replaced with Smiths. Now I have 27 revolvers and 3 autos. I really enjoy this one so I am going to post a picture again and the older of the two because to me they are able to show why I enjoy collecting, especially since I am not a poet and to me revolvers are works of art. 20190923_201835.jpg
 

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What a great question. My first gun was a S&W heavy barrel Model 10. Just the feel of that gun in my hand hooked me for life. I loved to shoot it and clean it. It was a fever. I saved my money and when I got enough I bought another one. Then I got hooked on stainless guns and as Paul Harvey used to say, that is the rest of the story.
 

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To me Looking at a Smith Wesson handgun is like an Art Student looking at a Rembrant or a Monet . Smith Wesson is the true artistry of the gun world. Clean lines flawless actions beautiful bluing and polished Stainles steel. Perfect balance . Out on the range they preform so wonderfully.

Having been to the smith Wesson plant in Springfield and seeing the art of making a fine Smith Wesson pistol you come to appreciate the hours of time and effort that went into the older guns . The making of grips and making sure the grip panels matched. It was a lesson in art poetry .

When I look at a Smith Wesson Revolver I behold the true treasure of the gun makers role on our society .

Just my thoughts
 

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I have a very mechanical mind. For me just looking at one is like looking at art. The proportions are so perfect that the gun can be scaled up or down and still look just right. Once you get past the looks there's the immense level of skill and craftsmanship necessary to build such a fine product. Not to discount the more modern guns but this is especially true of the more vintage pieces. I really appreciate the pride these workers obviously had in their product. On top of all this they are just gangs of fun to shoot and usually increase in value during ownership. It's quite the experience.
Sums it up for me. Other brand guns cycle through my hands..but in the end..my trusted S&W revolver shall comfort me into the unknown.
 

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What makes S&W revolvers special to me? The first revolver I ever bought was a S&W nickel plated four inch 19-3. My brother installed a target trigger and hammer. I carried it in a Bianchi 111 cross draw holster. Then I bought a six inch 28-2. Gorgeous revolvers. The 28 was particularly accurate. On a dare I once popped a beer bottle w/ one shot drawing from the holster. The bottle was a little over 100 yds. away. Everyone else was using rifles. The look on those folks faces would have made a good picture. i have won a number of matches shooting standard four inch 686's and my beloved Model 18. I've owned various Ruger and Colt pistols, both revolvers and automatics. Bought and got rid of three Pythons. They just never really got my attention. To delicate. Just have not ever found anything that suits me better than S&W revolvers. Sincerely. bruce.
 

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I've carried S&W's for neigh on half a century.
Carried pre-27s and model 29s while working as a LEO.

But, the one's that become endeared to me, are the one's that I carried on the adventures of my life.

I won't bore y'all with stories....The revolver pictured below, has rode on my hip
for hundreds of miles a horseback, and dare I say thousands of miles in the pickup truck.

It's like an old friend that can't be left behind.



I've carried this revolver on a many mountain elk hunts, and this revolver help
me kill my best bull to date. She won her ivories and the engraving on that trip.






.
 

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My first revolver was a Colt Python. It was one of the most beautiful guns I'd ever seen, but it had one flaw I could never get past. The gun was always out of time and it would shave lead and spit it out everywhere. It spent more time at the gunsmith than it did on my hip. My job required that I carried a handgun, so when my Colt was in the shop I would borrow a S&W model 19. The model 19 operated flawlessly, and never spent a minute in the shop for repairs. It was well worn, and had an amazing trigger. I eventually switched jobs and I left the Colt behind. I never owned another revolver until 2009 when I given a model 14. I still have it to this day, and have no intention of parting with it. It has the best trigger of any gun I own to this day.

That model 14 is what brought me to this forum, after I had a shot following a squib load blow up the barrel on it. I came here looking for information on what to do about the revolver barrel, and I've been here with your tolerance ever since.

100_0103.JPG

I was up on a mountain getting in some practice time when the gun blew up. My wife was my spotter and she saw it all happen.
The funniest part of it all was when I took that last shot, the bullet from the squib popped out of the barrel, and went downrange so slowly that I watched it go downrange in what looked like slow motion and I saw the bullet bounce off the target. I went to the base of the target a little while later and found the bullet laying on the ground, just below it.
I replaced the barrel and kept the damaged one. I left the bullet in the barrel as a reminder of what not to ever do again.
I still have the damaged casings, the barrel and the bullet that popped out when it was fired and blew up in my hands.
100_0158.JPG
 
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