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I'm bored sitting here at home so I got out some empty casings that needed to be cleaned and polished, but they're not turning out very good at all.
After running the vibratory tumbler for 4 hours nearly all of my rifle brass still looks a little dirty on the outside with what looks like water spots all over the brass. I had a few 44 mag casings in the lot and they look great on the outside, but filthy on the inside. None of the cartridges look clean on the inside at all.
I'm using a 50-50 mix of medium crushed walnut and fine corn. I added about a teaspoon of dawn, since I can't find my lemi-shine.
Any help or direction you can send me will be much appreciated.
 

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I start with Walnut media, then finish with corn and car polish. Make sure to change media often if you use a lot mate..

20200321_134108_resized.jpg

thewelshm
 

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I use about 50/50 course and fine media with a dollop of nufinish and a half a dryer sheet. 1 hr and it looks like jewelry. That is until the media gets real old. Once I see a black ring in the tumbler I know it's time to dump the media and scrub the tumbler.
 

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I wet tumble.

I use my depriming die on my 650 and remove the primers first.

Then I wet tumble using armor all, white vinegar, and hot water. 1.5 hours. I use the stainless steel pins during the process. Really gets the pockets and inner shells really clean and shiney.

Then I separate the pins and throw the brass in a good dehydrator.

After another 1.5 hours the brass is good as new.

I do usually use lubricant in the brass before I start the loading process.

I've had very good results with this process.

I know it's not the process you are using, but it's worked for me so far!

Good luck.

Moe

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As above, very important to deprime before wet tumbling. Not only to get primer pockets clean but spent primers holds a lot of water and takes forever to dry out. I’ve had misfires due to that.

To rejuvenate old media I’ll squirt a little lighter fluid into the media. I often run the vibrator as long as 8 hours.

What you’re seeing on your rifle brass is most likely tarnish. It is often difficult to remove.

Joe A.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm not trying to make them look new, I'm trying to make sure they're clean, inside and out, and they're still dirty inside.
Would de-priming them help to get the inside any cleaner? Would it help the media to pass thru the interior better?
 

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When I was doing DRY, I used walnut, Zilla pet bedding from Petco. I used a dollop of mineral spirits, ran twenty minutes BEFORE adding brass. Sometimes I would use NUFINISH, about a capful for 45 acp or 40 SW brass that I wanted to recover after firing. My Sig kicks far and wide. For reloading in a hurry wipe cases with a rag and mineral spirits. For grungy brass WET gets the job done. It can in fact get them too clean.

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I'm not trying to make them look new, I'm trying to make sure they're clean, inside and out, and they're still dirty inside.
Would de-priming them help to get the inside any cleaner? Would it help the media to pass thru the interior better?
Dry vibratory cleaning does not get the inside clean; to get the outside clean, add a capful of Nu-Finish (from Walmart) and the outsides will be shiny clean if the media is decent. Dawn is great for wet tumbling with s.s. pins.
 
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I'm bored sitting here at home so I got out some empty casings that needed to be cleaned and polished, but they're not turning out very good at all.
After running the vibratory tumbler for 4 hours nearly all of my rifle brass still looks a little dirty on the outside with what looks like water spots all over the brass. I had a few 44 mag casings in the lot and they look great on the outside, but filthy on the inside. None of the cartridges look clean on the inside at all.
I'm using a 50-50 mix of medium crushed walnut and fine corn. I added about a teaspoon of dawn, since I can't find my lemi-shine.
Any help or direction you can send me will be much appreciated.


Some where in the Hints from Heloise on brass cleaning you got the two methods confused.:D

You DO NOT add Dawn and or Lemi Shine to DRY media.(that is for wet tumbling)
Throw out you media and start over.
Dry just some coarse corn (corn polishes better) Walnut will clean but not polish as well. Use the 50/50 if you want.
With new media add several tablespoons (a few caps) of Nu Finish Car POLISH. Let the it run for 10 min before adding brass. Then vibrate for about 3 hrs.
To reactive the media add a cap of mineral spirits and a bit more Nu Finish. When the media gets dirty. ditch and use new. Its CHEAP

The insides do not need to be clean
 

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I have been using vibratory cleaners for years and seldom if ever worry about getting the interior of the cases shiny. In fact, I don’f ever see used brass clean up like the outside. I can’t see that adding a bit of Dawn to your solid media will help since it and Lexi-Shine are the products used with SS pins and wet media tumblers. You might try soaking your brass in Simple Green for several hours before putting them in your vibratory cleaner to loosen up the burned carbon inside your cases. If your media is new, you probably don’t yet need to add polishing agents.
 

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If you want to add a dry polishing media to your dry tumbling media, get some jeweler's rouge; it also works well. Nu-finish does a great job, but if added too quickly, can lump up in the media whereas rouge mixes easily enough as it is dry also. Either way, say no to Dawn and Lemi-shine unless wet tumbling with pins
 

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I'm not trying to make them look new, I'm trying to make sure they're clean, inside and out, and they're still dirty inside.
For your peace of mind, may I suggest this: load both your spic & span cases & an equal no. of the dirtiest cases you can find (except for the primer pockets, which benefit from periodic cleaning), shoot them both side by side, & compare results. (I presume we're talking about handgun cartridges, & not whatever the hottest thing is on the bench-rest circuit.)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'm new at this reloading experiment. Lots of experience shooting, but none reloading. So I want to clean what brass I have managed to save from my shooting evolutions.

I have been shooting a fair bit of 8MM, 30-06, and .223 recently. So those are the rifle casings I'm wanting to get cleaned up the most.
I've never been at a point where I needed to get into reloading, but I'm trying to get prepared for reloading them. I have more .223 & 5.56 ammo to last quite a while, but not much 8MM. The rifle cartridges are what's driving me nuts. I'll try to apply some of these tips and see what level of improvements I can achieve.
I have tons of pistol casings to start working on, and those certainly seem the easiest to clean.

Should I remove the rifle primers before cleaning the casings, or will I do better leaving them in for now, and removing them after the casings are clean.
 

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I'm new at this reloading experiment. Lots of experience shooting, but none reloading. So I want to clean what brass I have managed to save from my shooting evolutions.

I have been shooting a fair bit of 8MM, 30-06, and .223 recently. So those are the rifle casings I'm wanting to get cleaned up the most.
I've never been at a point where I needed to get into reloading, but I'm trying to get prepared for reloading them. I have more .223 & 5.56 ammo to last quite a while, but not much 8MM. The rifle cartridges are what's driving me nuts. I'll try to apply some of these tips and see what level of improvements I can achieve.
I have tons of pistol casings to start working on, and those certainly seem the easiest to clean.

Should I remove the rifle primers before cleaning the casings, or will I do better leaving them in for now, and removing them after the casings are clean.
Greg sound like a "Sonic" cleaner would get you where you want to go, for interior, then tumble in walnut for shine on the outside mate.

thewelshm
 

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I'm new at this reloading experiment. Lots of experience shooting, but none reloading. So I want to clean what brass I have managed to save from my shooting evolutions.

I have been shooting a fair bit of 8MM, 30-06, and .223 recently. So those are the rifle casings I'm wanting to get cleaned up the most.
I've never been at a point where I needed to get into reloading, but I'm trying to get prepared for reloading them. I have more .223 & 5.56 ammo to last quite a while, but not much 8MM. The rifle cartridges are what's driving me nuts. I'll try to apply some of these tips and see what level of improvements I can achieve.
I have tons of pistol casings to start working on, and those certainly seem the easiest to clean.

Should I remove the rifle primers before cleaning the casings, or will I do better leaving them in for now, and removing them after the casings are clean.
The answer to that is - it depends. Because what will happen is that dry media WILL get stuck in the flash hole. SO, the answer becomes - do you want to make sure the flash holes are clean after, or do you do what I used to do - deprime after cleaning and then taking the RCBS primer pocket brush and cleaning them then; the main factor is volume - low volume, clean later; shoot a lot (like .223) deprime before cleaning and do the flash holes after
 
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I'm new at this reloading experiment. Lots of experience shooting, but none reloading. So I want to clean what brass I have managed to save from my shooting evolutions.

I have been shooting a fair bit of 8MM, 30-06, and .223 recently. So those are the rifle casings I'm wanting to get cleaned up the most.
I've never been at a point where I needed to get into reloading, but I'm trying to get prepared for reloading them. I have more .223 & 5.56 ammo to last quite a while, but not much 8MM. The rifle cartridges are what's driving me nuts. I'll try to apply some of these tips and see what level of improvements I can achieve.
I have tons of pistol casings to start working on, and those certainly seem the easiest to clean.

Should I remove the rifle primers before cleaning the casings, or will I do better leaving them in for now, and removing them after the casings are clean.
Hey Gear,

I only dry tumble. I leave my primers in, so that media does not stick in the primer pocket.

If you go to the wet tumble, then a UNIVERSAL DECAPPING DIE/TOOL may be in order. You want to de cap, prior to wet tumble. Wet tumble is a mess, if you do not have a slop sink handy (I don't).

I have been using BUCKWHEAT to tumble with, the last year or so.

Hope this helps.

Later, Mark
 
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