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Ill have to go to the range soon..:)
20190801_174549.jpg

thewelshm
 

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Being able to buy guns, have a fun hobby, and be able to defend ones family.. God Bless America....

thewelshm
 

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Being able to buy guns, have a fun hobby, and be able to defend ones family.. God Bless America....

thewelshm
Got me THREE of those terrible noaccount useless Ruger 1911s. One is a commander. Guess the 2 bigger ones are Admirals!

Do yourself a favor and let me take that turrible piece of magnificence off your hands!
 

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[/enablement on] Well... it's a start... [/enablement off]

Kidding aside, congratulations on your M1911a1. Know that you do tend to accumulate these pistols too once you get a taste... Kind of like a fine Kentucky Bourbon...
 

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Take it out, and shoot it enough to break it in and get used to the way it feels and how the trigger feels.

A few years ago, I was admiring a Springfield M1911a1 a friend at my gun club had (it was in 9mm, which I did not at that point have in a M1911a1).

He seemed unsatisfied with it, and asked me if I'd like to buy it, because he had his eye on a 9mm M1911a1 made by SIG that he wanted. Without much deliberation, I bought it from him, and have been quite happy with it ever since.

When I was telling another friend at the club about my 9mm M1911a1, he told me that the member I'd bought it from wasn't happy with the SIG, and wished he had the Springfield back again. To quote the meme, "What happens in the safe, stays in the safe...". I still have it, and enjoy shooting it regularly.

The point of all this is that there are differences in M1911a1 platform pistols that you may well experience for the first time when shooting your new Remington. Every new gun needs time to break in, and there are several subjective things you'll be noticing about your new pistol as you shoot it.

M1911a1 platform pistols are more precise than many that I've shot. Not the most precise, but considerably better than many polymer and even last generation steel frame single / double action pistols. There can be a considerable difference in the fitment of a new M1911a1 - variations from one example to the next in the exact model made by the factory.

One of my best M1911a1 pistols is a Springfield "Loaded" that I bought at the CMP Games at Camp Perry. It was not the most expensive gun they had on offer, but turned out to be the best fit. Frame to slide and barrel to bushing to slide fit makes a great deal of difference on this platform, and that fitting is properly done by hand based on some experience. I tried out a few dozen by cycling and dry firing them at the Springfield booth at the games. Unlike a gun shop, they had every one on offer out where you could pick it up and check it out. Some of the more costly were not as well fit as the one I eventually selected.

The gunsmiths that finish these pistols are working on a production line, and don't have time to obsess on individual pistols. An individual gun's fitment comes down to the experience that contributes to that final workmanship. I later replaced the barrel and action on a Colt that I'd bought at a gun show as a project gun. Someone had tried to make it into a "race gun" and really messed it up. Using the Jerry Kuhnhausen M1911 Shop Manual (I really recommend getting a copy of this book so that you can understand the action) I did obsess on fitting a new barrel and action for this pistol. With liberal use of "Prussian Blue" to mark parts and hand fit them, I was able to turn out a really nice M1911a1... And more importantly, learn how the action works and what adjustments are possible.

ColtM1911a1.jpg
 

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Take it out, and shoot it enough to break it in and get used to the way it feels and how the trigger feels.

A few years ago, I was admiring a Springfield M1911a1 a friend at my gun club had (it was in 9mm, which I did not at that point have in a M1911a1).

He seemed unsatisfied with it, and asked me if I'd like to buy it, because he had his eye on a 9mm M1911a1 made by SIG that he wanted. Without much deliberation, I bought it from him, and have been quite happy with it ever since.

When I was telling another friend at the club about my 9mm M1911a1, he told me that the member I'd bought it from wasn't happy with the SIG, and wished he had the Springfield back again. To quote the meme, "What happens in the safe, stays in the safe...". I still have it, and enjoy shooting it regularly.

The point of all this is that there are differences in M1911a1 platform pistols that you may well experience for the first time when shooting your new Remington. Every new gun needs time to break in, and there are several subjective things you'll be noticing about your new pistol as you shoot it.

M1911a1 platform pistols are more precise than many that I've shot. Not the most precise, but considerably better than many polymer and even last generation steel frame single / double action pistols. There can be a considerable difference in the fitment of a new M1911a1 - variations from one example to the next in the exact model made by the factory.

One of my best M1911a1 pistols is a Springfield "Loaded" that I bought at the CMP Games at Camp Perry. It was not the most expensive gun they had on offer, but turned out to be the best fit. Frame to slide and barrel to bushing to slide fit makes a great deal of difference on this platform, and that fitting is properly done by hand based on some experience. I tried out a few dozen by cycling and dry firing them at the Springfield booth at the games. Unlike a gun shop, they had every one on offer out where you could pick it up and check it out. Some of the more costly were not as well fit as the one I eventually selected.

The gunsmiths that finish these pistols are working on a production line, and don't have time to obsess on individual pistols. An individual gun's fitment comes down to the experience that contributes to that final workmanship. I later replaced the barrel and action on a Colt that I'd bought at a gun show as a project gun. Someone had tried to make it into a "race gun" and really messed it up. Using the Jerry Kuhnhausen M1911 Shop Manual (I really recommend getting a copy of this book so that you can understand the action) I did obsess on fitting a new barrel and action for this pistol. With liberal use of "Prussian Blue" to mark parts and hand fit them, I was able to turn out a really nice M1911a1... And more importantly, learn how the action works and what adjustments are possible.

View attachment 395029
Sweet looker there mate..

thewelshm
 
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