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Discussion Starter #1
Bought once used brass some 3 years ago on etsy and have been reloading it religiously over that time. Guess nothing lasts forever :(

Found these two when I was checking brass for reloading. Both the same head stamps but .. Guess I have to face the fact that I might start losing some of my old brass

469324
 

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That's what my 38s look like when they go; since I do not load thumper loads, I have brass decades old that still work fine.............
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Brass does wear out
I know.... hell I am wearing out .. I dont have to like either!! :)

I still have some 400 pcs of used brass and a bag of 200 unopened starline I havent put into play yet .. still .. sad day. :)
 

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I take my blood pressure meds because I don't want arteries looking like that...

When you get this old, things go wrong...

BTW, I see this on the range more with .45LC than with .38 or .357 cases. It could be stretching more because of large cylinder chambers, but also will fail from reworking it enough. And yes, I see more Nickle plated cases fail this way.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I was loading these up with 4.5gr of HP38 with a Magnum small primer. Yes I know I dont need to use magnum but .. I have a bunch of it and until now never had an issue. Having said that .. I have decided to back up the powder and my last 100 rds was 4.0 gr of hp38 with the magnum primer. I only use them in guns designed for .357.

Like I said .. cant complain. I have shot THOUSANDS of these rounds through a variety of guns and who really knows how many times the "once fired" brass is when you get it.

Interestingly both head stamps read "CBC" which I never heard of. Plan on making some jewelry with them. Nothing goes to waste.
 

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All I used for competition was nickel plated 38 Special brass. Got it from an uncle-ex-law. He worked in a steel mill and gave me two 5 gallon pails overflowing with the empties. At first, I had problems but determined my sizing die was oversizing the brass. Had it polished to a larger diameter and things went well after that. I do not rember the particulars but do know that most carbide dies produce undersized cases. I believe the dies used by the cowboy competitors are properly dimensioned.

So, that is one thing to consider. I used 2.8 grains of Bullseye and a 148 grain wadcutter bullet. Shot enough of those to produce multiple 5 gallon pails of empty primers. Still lost casings but that is a small cost of the sport.

Good luck!

Kevin
 

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I ran into a web article a while back where a guy took his press to a range and loaded a couple dozen new cases over and over until they failed. With 38 specials he got 50 or 60 loads. with his 45 acp he only had 1 crack, but wore the primer pockets loose after around 50-60 reloadings. Getting 50,000 reloads out of 1000 pieces of brass is a lot of shooting
 

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Nothing lasts forever. But I still use 30-06 and .222 Remington brass that my dad was shooting and reloading way back in the 1960s. They were always neck sized only and most of the few failures were when using them in something other the either the old 1917 Winchester or his 722 Remington. He always kept his brass sorted by the box and never owned a case cleaner of any type. A lot of his old 30-06 brass is military match and that stuff is sweet for reloading and accuracy. Dad also was never much of a max load fan, but his loads were accurate. We worked up different loads for my 30-06 Ruger #1 and 222 Sako and kept the brass separate from his. Have never annealed any brass either but I would do so for any rare, hard to find cartridges. Just can't see doing it for common calibers.

John
 
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