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Yesterday, I was able to look at a Victory model- lanyard ring, “V” serial number, Parkerized finish. The barrel marking says 38 S&W ctg. Plain, non- checkered service stocks. There are proof marks, maybe, on top of the barrel at the frame junction. I’ll need a better light and a glass to know for sure. Were the Victory models shipped to Great Britain in .38 S&W? I know they sent ones chambered in 38/200, but don’t know about 38 S&W. Hank
 

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Adirondacker, Thanks! My ignorance is both broad and deep! Jonesy, I didn’t pay that much attention. A 4” or 5”. I’ll check when I see her next, but it will be a couple of weeks. Hank
 

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Were the Victory models shipped to Great Britain in .38 S&W? I know they sent ones chambered in 38/200, but don’t know about 38 S&W. Hank
By the time the V prefix serials started, in May/June 1942, only 5” barreled revolvers were produced in .38 S&W for the British, so that’s what you should find.

The .38/200 moniker is a strange one. In hindsight, basically nobody back then seems to have used it. Certainly not the British, who called the caliber .380 (Mk I for the 200gr bullet, Mk IIz for the later 178gr jacketed bullet). The only “official” use is found on the barrels of the Colt Official Police 38-200, which was the version Colt made for the British. The best explanation is that it was born as an American designation for .38 S&W/.38 Colt NP guns sighted for the old British 200gr bullet. But S&W never used it on the guns.
 

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Thanks Absalom! She may want to sell the Victory model and, perhaps, a Model 57. If so, I’ll try to post here first. Some additional investigation first! Hank
 
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