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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked this up at auction for cheap, The gold in the insignia and writing stood out to me, the serial# puts it as a 4th change hand ejector, but other than that I have no information, and I haven't found one with the gold in the stamping yet, not even a picture. Can you guys fill me in? Year or mfg or range thereof, it's in the 700K range. Also, if I were to move it along...what's a reasonable asking range?


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Not factory original, that's aftermarket gold fill... Brownells currently sells a product called Lacquer-stik, comes in gold, red, black. etc.

The popular product was Bonanza gold-fill inlay powder.

The gun is just a solid shooter grade gun, nothing special... It's missing the upper side plate screw which lowers the value, and it's unusual in that it looks to have a lanyard swivel on the butt, which was not standard on a 4th Change, and that being non-original can also affect value, but not as much for a shooter.

Concerns about the swivel being added after it left the factory... is how well it was installed, many amateurish jobs in drilling the lanyard hole illegally obfuscated the serial number on the butt frame. On guns from the factory, the s/n is spaced out to allow for the lanyard hole. Yours looks to be drilled forward of the s/n, which is usually an indicator of it being added after it left the factory.

Pricing depends on you location, our prices in CA are crazy high and very atypical, so I'll let someone else comment on selling price.
 

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It's a .38 S&W (Not .38 Special). Lack of stamps probably makes it a Canadian version of a BSR (38/200)- hence the lanyard loop. Prolly shipped during the war (early 40's). Get a new screw from Numrich or Brownells and have some fun. kfjdrfirii

BSR -British Service Revolver- they were chambered in .38 S&W
 

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700's would be very late 1940's to Jul 1941.
 
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Congrats! The revolver looks to be in pretty good shape. A great addition to any collection.:)
 
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An early "lend/lease" gun from WWII. Looks like correct grips and everything else except most of these guns were covered in British proof marks.:rolleyes: You got a good pistol there with lots of S&W history surrounding it.
 

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I paid 300 for the one from 1919 and 225 for the rougher one. These are 38 Special but are very accurate and fun to shoot. So as said get the pllate screw and have fun shooting it.
I have these two earlier versions, this one 1919
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This one a little more use from 1917
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I paid 300 for the one from 1919 and 225 for the rougher one. These are 38 Special but are very accurate and fun to shoot. So as said get the pllate screw and have fun shooting it.
.38 Special or .38 S&W? Different cats.
 

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Less the gold fill and missing screw, your 1940 British service is in pretty good condition. These guns were commercial grade and were used initially to pay off a one million dollar debt incurred as the result of a failed light rifle project. If the serial in the grip is a match you have a desirable piece in the WWII collector market. It is likely not Canadian since it does not bear their property mark above the left grip, but check the butt and elsewhere for an arrow in a C stamp.

Many of the guns in the summer of 1940 went straight to units. The summer of 1940 was a very tough time for the Brits. The official cartridge was the .380 Rimmed Mark II, a .38 S&W case with a 175 grain bullet and more horsepower than granny's old top-break could handle. You can shoot .38 S&W or .38 Colt New Police all you care to.

Enjoy it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Funny, the numbers on the crane and frame behind it match, and the numbers on the butt and cylinder match, but they're two different sets of numbers. Also, this C with a broad arrow in it....capitol C, the arrow being 3 lines coming to a point, facing upwards? If that's it, there's one just above the trigger and to the left, on the right side of the frame. You can sort of see it in the second last photo.
 

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Funny, the numbers on the crane and frame behind it match, and the numbers on the butt and cylinder match, but they're two different sets of numbers. Also, this C with a broad arrow in it....capitol C, the arrow being 3 lines coming to a point, facing upwards? If that's it, there's one just above the trigger and to the left, on the right side of the frame. You can sort of see it in the second last photo.

Funny, the numbers on the crane and frame behind it match, and the numbers on the butt and cylinder match, but they're two different sets of numbers. Also, this C with a broad arrow in it....capitol C, the arrow being 3 lines coming to a point, facing upwards? If that's it, there's one just above the trigger and to the left, on the right side of the frame. You can sort of see it in the second last photo.
The Capitol C and arrow definitely means it was a Canadian owned S&W. The Serial is on the butt, back of cylinder and underside of barrel. The numbers on crane, frame and inside side plate are assembly numbers to keep the fitted parts identified during finishing prior to the serial number being added. Hopefully no one has modified the cylinder to also fit 38 special cartridge.
 
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