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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello everyone! I'm brand new to this forum, yes I am reading the information already posted, but I'm hoping that starting this discussion will help narrow things down. My dad came into possession of this gun in 1976 and was told it belonged to his father, who died in Vietnam, that it was his military service piece. But he has been getting conflicting information and no other history of this gun. He asked us to turn it in for a thorough cleaning and inspection. While I'm waiting I thought I would try to find out more about this gun. I made sure to include the pictures I took before turning it in, I'm sorry to say I didn't get any of the top of the barrel or with the cylinder open. Any information would be greatly appreciated by both me and my dad.
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British Service Revolver or BSR from WWII. Note the British proof stamps. Be aware 38 S&W is NOT 38 Special. You should check to see if this was reamed for 38 Spl cartridges. They often were.
Someone more up on these will be by. Welcome to the forum!
 
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Welcome to the forum. You have a British service revolver from the WW2 era. They tended to have a 5 inch barrel and yours appears to have been cut down. If your grandfather carried it in Vietnam, it would have been an unofficial personal weapon, not one issued by the military. That specific model was used by British and Commonwealth troops in WW2, but was never issued to American troops. The original caliber was 38 S&W, not 38 special, though it may have been reamed to accept 38 specials when the barrel was cut. The various proof marks (BNP) were done when the gun left British service and was sold on the market.
We often get very similar posts where the person finds a relatives gun and assumes it was their gun when in the service. The thing to remember is that the government is glad to loan you a gun or a tank when you sign up, but they generally frown on you keeping those items when your enlistment is up
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome to the forum. You have a British service revolver from the WW2 era. They tended to have a 5 inch barrel and yours appears to have been cut down. If your grandfather carried it in Vietnam, it would have been an unofficial personal weapon, not one issued by the military. That specific model was used by British and Commonwealth troops in WW2, but was never issued to American troops. The original caliber was 38 S&W, not 38 special, though it may have been reamed to accept 38 specials when the barrel was cut. The various proof marks (BNP) were done when the gun left British service and was sold on the market.
We often get very similar posts where the person finds a relatives gun and assumes it was their gun when in the service. The thing to remember is that the government is glad to loan you a gun or a tank when you sign up, but they generally frown on you keeping those items when your enlistment is up
Thank you for the information so far. I hope to be able to find out more and pass it on to my dad.
 
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