Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was at a Gun Show last weekend looking at revolvers. I was hoping to find something that could double as a target shooter and home guardian. I found a very nice S&W with adjustable rear sights and asked to take it in hand. When I then asked if I could pull the trigger, the owner snatched it out of my hand and looked at me like I had a venereal disease.

A guy I know at work says that while he watches TV, he eats potato chips, and dry fires his Ruger GP 100 50 times a sitting "to smooth out the pull."

Is one, or are both of these guys nuts? Is dry firing that bad? Is dry firing 50 times a night insane? How can a buyer judge the feel of a trigger? What about firing with a spent case in the cylinder?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
898 Posts
If a gun is mint, the seller may not want dry firing to contribute to a turn line on the cylinder..of course, an easy fix is to open the cylinder and pull back on the latch and then pull the trigger....if it already has line, then the seller is just being a putz.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,121 Posts
Good advice, sip...
And I wonder how many sellers even know it's possible to check the trigger-pull like that?!
Don
:shock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,237 Posts
On the other hand one day in a gunshop I observed a fellow come in and go to the floor rack and starting at one end of the rifle rack he picked up each rifle and pulled the trigger and put it back in the rack and picked up the next. He got almost to the end of the rack before the clerk incharge demanded that he stop. They were not expensive rifles but some were some rimfire rifles that can easily be damaged by dryfiring. I have seen an expensive AYA Spanish Double Shotgun damaged by one pull of the trigger without a dryfiring dummy round in the gun.

Another time I observed the gunshop owner showing a man and his wife a revolver. The woman was handed the revolver and she immediately pointed it at the owner and pulled the trigger several times. The owner stopped his talking and when he didn't answer the woman's questions he only said "I can't I'm Dead." The woman then got really huffy. They left without making the purchase.

I have also found a live round in a shotgun that was put there by a customer or looker. I have heard that the large store north of here has found live rounds on numerous occasions.

I believe this is where the NEVER DRYFIRE mentality comes from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
macbeth said:
Is dry firing that bad?
Normally dry firing won't hurt the gun. Excessive dry firing will damage and wear parts out. As mentioned, 22 firing pins may hit the cylinder face, so as a rule 22s shouldn't be dryfired.
On centerfire S&Ws, excessive dry firing can cause the timing to go bad. As you dry fire the gun the hand is still turning the cylinder, so the cylinder timing lugs will wear, the cylinder notches will start to peen if you pull the trigger fast, and the cylinder stop will wear. The frame slot may widen and loosen up the stop further.

If you want to dry fire a S&W then I recommend opening the cylinder, pulling the cylinder release to the rear, then dry fire until your blue in the face. At least your not going to wear out the important stuff. hpzl;n;

I fixed a J frame once because it was dry fired a lot. The pin that holds the firing pin bushing broke and the bushing dry fired itself nearly out of the frame. I ordered another retaining pin and put the firing pin bushing back were it belonged. I recommended snap caps for this one...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Hey macbeth, welcome to the S&W Forum! Glad to have you here! :) Too bad he acted that way and didn't take time to show you how to check things out without snapping the trigger - and he lost a sale!

There are ways to check the cylinder indexing, operation, and cycle of a revolver without allowing the hammer to fall on the firing pin. Too complicated for me to try to describe in a post on here. :) The next time you go to a show, try to find a friendly fellow with a bunch of older S&Ws and some SWCA stuff on his table. If he's not busy with another customer, I bet he'll give you a lesson on how to give a S&W revolver a good run-through without dry firing.

That being said - I don't allow anyone to dry fire any of my weapons. Besides what was stated previously, I choose to presume that they're all loaded - all the time. That's the mentality I have about a firearm of any sort - anywhere - and that's what I taught my kids. Cavalier handling of unloaded firearms gets folks shot and killed every day! I've even heard stories about sick sociopaths and anti-gun nuts who covertly place loaded rounds in firearms at shops and gun shows!

IMO, dry fire-practice is an accident waiting to happen. I attended a handgun developer course last year where the instructors fervently recommended daily dry-fire exercises in lieu of weekly or twice-monthly shooting sessions. I was slapped down when I voiced my objections. I still think that I am right! :)

xtm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
sipowicz said:
.....of course, an easy fix is to open the cylinder and pull back on the latch and then pull the trigger....
That will work.

Just thought I'd add this: unless you continue to hold the latch back all-the-way while you are operating the hammer and trigger, the internal hammer block can ride along the back curve of the hammer and scrape off the case colors. I'm not sure I'd let anyone do that to my for-sale revolver - without instructions.

xtm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Wow! What a rainbow of information. I came away feeling that, as silly as it might be, I'll take the seller's word regarding the trigger on my first gun. After I'm experienced I might ask to fire it at the range if I think I know what I'm doing.

Thank you all for helping me out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
xtimberman said:
That being said - I don't allow anyone to dry fire any of my weapons. Besides what was stated previously, I choose to presume that they're all loaded - all the time. That's the mentality I have about a firearm of any sort - anywhere - xtm
Same deal here. It might be a little dogmatic but that's the way my Dad showed me and it has kept me out of trouble thusfar.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Just a little thought for everyone. Whether you are dry firing or looking or whatever, just simply check to see if the darn thing is loaded before anything else. Remember, the best safety is the one on your shoulders. If it is not loaded (checked and rechecked), then it cannot go off. If you check the firearm and hand it to someone else to look at, hand it to them opened and have them check it as well. My normal routine (revolver topic) is to open the cylinder and check the cylinder and barrel. When I hand it to someone, the cylinder is open and my fingers are through the opening where the cylinder is when normally shut. This way, they are assured you are giving them a safe firearm and it makes them think a little too, even if they are not. Good Luck and think safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
FUUN063,
Same here.
Maybe we should start a Basic Handgun Safety sticky thread? Great for the novice and really doesn't hurt to be reminded of the basics.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top