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Discussion Starter #1
After reading Jonesy's thread about his grip surgery

https://www.smithandwessonforums.com/forum/armory/203103-grip-reduction-surgery.html

I decided to "personalize" a set of Thai grips I have for a gp100. I have two sets of the same grips since i like them and figured if I screwed up I still had the other set.

Turns out .. so far so awesome! The finish came off with just a little nail polish remover from the dollar store and a brush. It actually went to bare wood MUCH faster than I thought it would.

I hacked off about 1/2in at the bottom and did some contouring. I used Minwax Mahogany stain, stain not the poly stuff and I did two coats and the grips look pretty cool and I love the color where I never liked the orangy color of the original.

So tomorrow it will be ready for a top coat .. I have good tung oil and was planning on using that but .. I have never used it on anything but bare wood and am worried it will lift the lovely stain and mess up the look. I have poly but .. I kind of hate poly and I have Clear rustoleum enamel.

So ... to those that have used it .. will the tung applied with a rag mess up my coloring? has anyone ever tried the Rustoleum Enamal?
Alex
 

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On my M1 Garand rifles, I have used diluted boiled linseed oil. Multiple hand rubbed coats of the BLO diluted with mineral spirits three parts BLO to one part mineral spirits.

This finish requires hand rubbing with light 0000 steel wool used between coats to open up wood pores. I do 5-6 coats. The finish works because the hand rubbing creates enough heat and pressure to drive the BLO into the wood pores.

The wood for Garand stocks is either walnut or beech.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
On my M1 Garand rifles, I have used diluted boiled linseed oil. Multiple hand rubbed coats of the BLO diluted with mineral spirits three parts BLO to one part mineral spirits.

This finish requires hand rubbing with light 0000 steel wool used between coats to open up wood pores. I do 5-6 coats. The finish works because the hand rubbing creates enough heat and pressure to drive the BLO into the wood pores.

The wood for Garand stocks is either walnut or beech.
I like the linseed and I like the tung oil although the tung isnt as durable as the linseed .. I just dont know how either will affect the stain. Everything I ever put either on was bare wood just to protect and bring up its natural grain. I am not married to these grips so ... I think I am going to try the tung oil because I have a huge tin and I will report back if it destroyed the stain job.
 

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On my M1 Garand rifles, I have used diluted boiled linseed oil. Multiple hand rubbed coats of the BLO diluted with mineral spirits three parts BLO to one part mineral spirits.

This finish requires hand rubbing with light 0000 steel wool used between coats to open up wood pores. I do 5-6 coats. The finish works because the hand rubbing creates enough heat and pressure to drive the BLO into the wood pores.

The wood for Garand stocks is either walnut or beech.
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I have used Tung Oil on stained wood, with minwax stain. Since its an oil, it doesn't raise the grain like water would and it doesn't seem to affect the stain. Wipe a kind of heavy coat on with a rag and let it sit for 5 -10 minutes, but don't let it get sticky/tacky then wipe off real well. Rub it in to the wood vigorously as wiping the excess off. Try to generate a little warmth doing it. First coat should be dry enough to steel wool lightly, fairly quickly, maybe 3-4 hours if its warm and dry then re-coat the same way. I would let third coat dry longer before buffing with steel wool and re-coating and I don't steel wool between 4th and last coat. With Tung oil it is good to re-apply a coat every year if the grips get handled a lot and every 2-3 years if it doesn't
Tung oil penetrates the space between wood fibers and hardens as it dries. It will dry 100% where linseed oil will never completely dry. Tung oil is resistant to water and mold and is superior to linseed oil in my opinion . . . 20 years as a cabinet maker
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have used Tung Oil on stained wood, with minwax stain. Since its an oil, it doesn't raise the grain like water would and it doesn't seem to affect the stain. Wipe a kind of heavy coat on with a rag and let it sit for 5 -10 minutes, but don't let it get sticky/tacky then wipe off real well. Rub it in to the wood vigorously as wiping the excess off. Try to generate a little warmth doing it. First coat should be dry enough to steel wool lightly, fairly quickly, maybe 3-4 hours if its warm and dry then re-coat the same way. I would let third coat dry longer before buffing with steel wool and re-coating and I don't steel wool between 4th and last coat. With Tung oil it is good to re-apply a coat every year if the grips get handled a lot and every 2-3 years if it doesnt
Thanks man! I nailed the color, did ok with the reshaping but I think if I can get a nice finish I may love them!
 

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And of course you will post pictures here when it is all finished, right?
 

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Tung oil wont darken with age. It should leave the color looking slightly darker, but very little, like when the stain was wet
 
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