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Discussion Starter #1
Because their are going to be more and more members taking up reloading out of necessity, I think this is a good time to start a thread on tips & tricks of reloading. I'll start with a method of eliminating static in your powder thrower & funnels. Take baby shampoo and Wash them throughly, blow dry them then put your powder measure back togther. This works wonders. :)
 
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Don't know if this should come under tips or advice...
I tell beginning reloaders to spend the extra and get the carbide dies. If your diligent and tumble your brass to a clean/bright shine, this eliminates the need to case lube. They can go straight into the dies without fear of scratching. Saving a messy step....

giz
 

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Well, this subject didn't get much play, and I was hoping it would. Let's bump it back on top..
 

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When considering equipment for a new reloader ask about their comfort with mechanical devices. In doing this it will give you a little insight as to which equipment to suggest. Some have to walk before they run, others can run right away.

Even though I have made a living repairing things, from automobiles to computers and everything in between, I started with a single stage press. Not because of lack of mechanical aptitude, because I started reloading when I still had 5 kids at home and only one income, hence the next criteria on equipment selection, money.

Every press out there is going to function as designed (except maybe the Lee progressives :lol: )
The next criteria is amount of ammo needed. If you are loading for a family that shoots in competition it maybe a good idea to start on a Dillon progressive.

FWIW
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here's a trick I've used for many years. When your tumbling your brass cut a sheet of bounce into four Peaces. Put it in with your walnut Medea, The bounce is coated with wax, it not only helps clean the brass but helps keep it from tarnishing and makes priming a snap. :)
 

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I use Sno Seal as a case lube for pistol cases. Its a beesway base. I usually rub a half a fingertip full between my thumb and fingers and scrunch this around in 100 cases. Even with carbide dies it eases the effort of sizing. You don't have to coat every case.
 
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Static can also be removed by simply wiping down with a used dryer fabric softener sheet.
 

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I use an ultrasonic cleaner with a water/vinegar/baking soda, soap mixture to clean up my brass. It doesn't get a brilliant shine like tumbling but it cleans everything (primer pocket, inside the case, etc.) at the rate of about 25 cases in 380 seconds! I found an inexpensive ultasonic cleaner at one of the bargan tool places in San Antonio (Harbor Freight?) for about $75 +/-. If you tumble them after ultrasonic cleaning, they look like brand new cases. If you guys are interested, I'll post the cleaning solution recipe. :)
 

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Yes, Charlie...
If you'd post your 'recipe' we'd be much obliged!
:ymapplause:
Don
 

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I cannot take credit for the mix. I got it from an internet source that I will name as soon as I find my hard copies. From memory (???) it was: 50% water, 50% white vinegar, a drop or two of dish soap, 'bout a 1/2 teaspoon (or less) of baking soda, and cook (the ultrasonic cleaner also heats the water) for about 4 to 6 minutes or until clean. You can use a batch of the cleaner about 3 to 5 times depending on how dirty the brass is, etc. I generally run about 25 handgun cases at a time based on the capacity of the cleaner. I rinse them in cold water and blow them dry with an air hose. Sometimes there may be residue inside the case or primer pocket but it's loose and comes right out. I don't think the mix or the time is very critical. It works pretty good for me and really isn't very time consuming or troublesome and it's a lot more quiet in the shop than with the tumbler going. Feel free to experiment.
 

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Charlie said:
If you guys are interested, I'll post the cleaning solution recipe. :)

Um, DUH!

:lol:
 
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Think we'd all like to see the "Recipe" ;)

Here's another tip for the folks that want to try shooting Black Powder in their cartridges. Clean a soda bottle out and just add some windex and water. About 1/3 windex and 2/3rds water. As soon as you unload your sixgun or rifle of the spent cartridges, throw them in the soda bottle. This will help keep the brass from staining until your ready to clean it. When you get ready, dump the brass and dry it...before tumbling. It will always clean up like new...

giz
 
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Oooops...

Should have mentioned that you should use the vinegar based Windex in the green bottle... :oops:

giz
 

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Since this thread started, we've added several new members. Time to bump this to the top again..

There's been some great tips so far.. keep 'em coming, guys!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I have found over the years on my single stage press, that if I leave the sizing & seating die loose when running the brass up the die it centers it. With the brass in the die I then tighten down the lock ring. ;)
 

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A tip I would like to share with new reloaders: I have seen so many posts " what is the best load for such & such cartridge?" I'd like to advise reloaders to buy a good current reloading manual & study it, two or three would be better. Most of them have tips for reloading that are very good & Lyman sometimes suggest the most accurate load in their manuals. Thanks Frank
 

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Frank V said:
A tip I would like to share with new reloaders: I have seen so many posts " what is the best load for such & such cartridge?" I'd like to advise reloaders to buy a good current reloading manual & study it, two or three would be better. Most of them have tips for reloading that are very good & Lyman sometimes suggest the most accurate load in their manuals. Thanks Frank
Frank, you hit that one right square on the head. As a study in that, three of us got 270 rifles around the same time. all three are by different makers but all are the same twist rate. None of them are happy with the same bullet, amount of powder or OAL.
 

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In reloading manuals and gun magazines, we see all of the photographs of fabulous reloading rooms with benches covered with the finest equipment and shelves filled with long rows of canisters of every gunpowder imaginable.

That's all very photogenic, but IMO, gunpowders should be stored away from the reloading bench where actual cartridge assembly occurs. The single cannister of the gunpowder you are using should be sitting on the bench where you are working - front and center. All other gunpowders should be put away and out of sight to avoid mishaps.

When your reloading is completed, the unused powder can be returned back into the same canister that it was poured from when you began. Then and only then should it be returned to the storage area with the other gunpowders.

Having more than one different opened cannister close at hand can be confusing - particularly if your reloading is interrupted for a day or so. There are those of us who can attest to the disappointment of spoiling a batch of gunpowder by pouring in some of the wrong variety after we were finished and cleaning up the area. :?

xtm
 
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