Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Walther PPK. Manufactured in December 1941. I wonder what was on the radio in the Walther factory that month. This pistol is an Eagle C... issued to the Reich Police. The Nazi police were in the forefront of the Holocaust and actively participated in liquidations of ghettos and other atrocities. I’d like to think this pistol sat in a drawer in Hamburg until some GI liberated it... but I don’t think so. It’s very accurate. Probably should toss it away.
0E0F3837-5315-4499-86CB-BDC039CEBE5F.jpeg
3C92D5D2-F76C-4883-BBA7-99FEC894D76D.jpeg

C493FEB3-AE43-4B1D-B009-A98148611EEA.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Walther PPK. Manufactured in December 1941. I wonder what was on the radio in the Walther factory that month. This pistol is an Eagle C... issued to the Reich Police. The Nazi police were in the forefront of the Holocaust and actively participated in liquidations of ghettos and other atrocities. I’d like to think this pistol sat in a drawer in Hamburg until some GI liberated it... but I don’t think so. It’s very accurate. Probably should toss it away.
View attachment 488057 View attachment 488058
View attachment 488059
Those bastard Nazi cops must have crapped their shorts when the Airborne came over and popped their chutes; or the Infantry drove into town.

Because they knew that they had come to kill THEM.

That is a really nice gun, a real classic.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,148 Posts
I also collect German handguns.

For me, they represent victory over the evils of National Socialism instead of the horrors they were used to commit until the Allies won. They are literally history in your hand, and history cuts all ways. We have these guns because our fathers and grandfathers won the battles and ultimately the war.

They also represent something people of good conscious should never forget, and that is what happens when tyrants dominate government and make the people "subjects" instead of citizens.

Remember that the first thing that the Nazi government did was disarm private citizens, and especially their more undesirable subjects. Through manipulation of a series of decrees passed under the Democratic Weimar Republic's Reichstag, the Nazis made sure that the subjected civilians could not fight back. History repeats itself.

That pistol could just of easily been captured early in the war, and used by underground agents to continuously interfere with Nazi operations and infrastructure. It still might have been deadly, but in the service of self defense and righteousness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,906 Posts
I know guns are just tools no better or worse than the man who uses it. Having said that I wont buy a gun with NAZI markings, just leave them to collectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,616 Posts
To me it's like the often debated topic; "Would you buy a gun used in a suicide or murder?" If it was a model or make, something of value I'd like to have, I wouldn't hesitate to acquire it. On the flipside, I would NOT buy a car that someone committed suicide in or were murdered in and not because I'd be spooked by it. My reasons come from folks I've known who have, all here in Arizona where heat is a major factor in our world. These cars unfortunately sat for enough time with dead bodies where the heat seared in the stench that simply could not be removed no matter how well the cars were cleaned and/or detailed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,160 Posts
My dad had an old Stevens visible loader, 22 rifle. He left it home when he joined the Air Force. His younger brother took it out and someone had a negligent discharge. One of the boys was hit in the head and it was fatal. The one kid said he did it then later said it was my uncle that had the gun at the time. Not sure if they ever determined who was responsible. My dad had to go to the sheriffs office at the courthouse to retrieve his rifle when home on leave. I don't ever remember it being shot again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,570 Posts
If one is uncomfortable owning a gun for some reason then avoid that model, marking etc. Buy only new in the box if your imagination runs too wild. I own U.S. and foreign military and police marked firearms and sleep soundly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,189 Posts
To me it's like the often debated topic; "Would you buy a gun used in a suicide or murder?" If it was a model or make, something of value I'd like to have, I wouldn't hesitate to acquire it. On the flipside, I would NOT buy a car that someone committed suicide in or were murdered in and not because I'd be spooked by it. My reasons come from folks I've known who have, all here in Arizona where heat is a major factor in our world. These cars unfortunately sat for enough time with dead bodies where the heat seared in the stench that simply could not be removed no matter how well the cars were cleaned and/or detailed.
Reminds me of a story one of my hunting buddy told me and I don't doubt it's not 100% true either. He's in the propane business and when he was a young buck, he caught his girlfriend fooling around on him so, to get even he took a bottle of Methyl Mercaptan and dumped it on the seat and carpet of her lovers 'vette' If you don't know what that is, it's the odorant they put in Propane and NG to give it a smell and in concentrate, there is no getting rid of the stench. he told me the boyfriend had to junk the car.... I get a charge out of that story every time he tells it. I know he did exactly that. he's a vindictive bugger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I own the firearm and use it for good.

However it was part of a haunting history:

SS testimony

“I went to the woods alone. The Wehrmacht had already dug a grave. The children were brought along in a tractor. I had nothing to do with this technical procedure. The Ukrainians were standing around trembling. The children were taken down from the tractor. They were lined up along the top of the grave and shot so that they fell into it. The Ukrainians did not aim at any particular part of the body. They fell into the grave. The wailing was indescribable. I shall never forget the scene throughout my life. I find it very hard to bear. I particulary remember a small fair-haired girl who took me by the hand. She too was shot later.... The grave was near some woods. It was not near the rifle-range. The execution must have taken place in the afternoon at about 3:30 or 4:00. It took place the day after the discussions at the Feldkommandanten.... Many children were hit four or five times before they died.”
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,148 Posts
Thus, 229 years ago, our US nation's founding fathers took the opportunity to correct some omissions in our constitution and wrote the "Bill of Rights".

Number two (important in it's precedence) made sure that free citizens had access to the tools needed to stay that way in a world of abusive tyrants.

The fact that the nation lead by tyrants lost, and that you have that Walther PPK pistol has ensured that that tool would not be misused again as long as righteous free people walk the earth.

When I see attacks on a democratic representative republic that has contributed so much to the world since it's founding, it troubles me. This Walther PPK should also continue to remind free people of what happens if it returns to the hands of tyrants.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Blackcloud2

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,189 Posts
I find it also interesting that a German Luger in mint condition (especially one an officer had with it's holster intact) commands such a high price. 2 years ago I bid on one and when the auction price went above 3K, I quit. I know some of you collect Lugers but I think that other than a collectible, they are ugly firearms. JMO. I was interested only from an investment standpoint, certainly not for the weapon's actual use.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top