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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In 1899 Smith & Wesson introduced their new K Frame, six-shot, side hand-eject, .38 caliber, double action revolver with fixed sights. Known at various times from its introduction, as the "Hand Ejector", "Military & Police", "Victory Model", and eventually the "Model 10" (in1957), around six million were manufactured in its variations, making it the most popular revolver of the 20th Century and perhaps ever.

Adopted by the U.S. Military as the "Caliber .38 Military & Police Revolver", it was chambered in the .38 S&W/Long Colt (a black powder cartridge). It saw service in the Philippine-American War (1899-1902), and the Moro Rebellion (1899-1913), where the cartridge was deemed inadequate at stopping Moro warriors. The Military snapped up available civilian market Colt M1909 revolvers chambered in .45 (aka "Long Colt"), and rushed them into the conflict (the Colt M1911 was still in development). But that's another story. The S&W M&P was then re-chambered for the more powerful .38 S&W Special cartridge (aka ".38 Special"). As the 4th variation, it served dependably and accurately during WWI in vast numbers. After WWI, the S&W M&P would become the most issued police sidearm for the next 70 years.

As WWII heated up in Europe, the "Victory Model" (with the addition of a lanyard ring and sandblasted and Parkerized finish), was rolled out and supplied to the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa under the Lend-Lease program in the .38/200 cartridge (aka the .38 S&W cartridge modified for military use by the British). But when the United States entered the war, the United States Army, Navy, and Marine aircrews, were issued .38 S&W Special Victories.

Famously, Greg "Pappy” Boyington, WWII Marine Pilot ("Flying Leatherneck"), Medal of Honor winner, Ace Pilot credited with 28 kills, is known for shooting the lights out of the Officer' Club with the Victory Model he carried (no citations or awards issued for this engagement). An easy-shooting weapon with credible accuracy, the double-action Victory could be carried by military aviators in Condition 1 (ready to fire with one hand). This was necessary in case the member of the aircrew was injured and had the use of one hand only. The M1911 .45 acp wasn't cleared to be carried in Condition 1 and needed two hands to put it into battery, so it wasn't officially issued to aircrews.

For these reasons, American combat aircrews were issued Victory Models in WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and Operation Desert Storm (up to 1991). The Victory Model was then replaced by the Beretta M92 9mm that can be carried in Condition 1. United States Navy security personnel were issued the Victory Model until 1995.

With a military service record that spans 96 years, and the most popular handgun of the 20th Century, the handgun now known as the S&W Model 10, has had perhaps the most profound impact of any handgun model manufactured!

Pictured is a Victory Model made in the early 1940s. It's chambered in .38 S&W Special. Without any U.S. Property marks, this weapon most likely began its duty-life as a sidearm for homeland security forces guarding factories, transportation, or shipping. Quickly adopted by Law Enforcement, the Victory is paired with a 1940s-early 1950s style duty belt. This would be the type of duty belt worn by the fictional former Sheriff of Absaroka County, Lucian Connally, in the "Longmire" mystery series of novels written by Craig Johnson.

Below the duty belt is a contemporary S&W Model 10 Classic in .38 Special + P for comparison. Accessorized with Safariland J-K2C COMP II Speedloaders (the best daily carry speed loaders EVER), this Model 10 Classic sports elk horn grips from Grashorns Gunworks LLC, out of Wyoming.
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Everyday carry


Since I've mentioned the Colt M1909 above, I am compelled by weapon-geekery to do a follow-up. The Colt M1909 was the last sidearm to be issued by the U.S. military in .45 Colt (aka, Long Colt, as opposed to .45 acp). It can be seen as the sidearm of Gary Cooper in the 1939 movie "The Real Glory" (shown being used to smash the ends of candles to be used as fake dynamite).
Hand Black Human Finger Style


In the next photo is an actual Colt M1909 sent to battle the Moros. It also sports elk horn grips from Grashorns Gunworks LLC (similar to grips on Gary Cooper's sidearm). While speed loaders were patented and manufactured as early as 1893, black powder fouling might have kept the widespread use of speed loaders from being practical. The Prideaux Speedloader for the .455 Webley Revolver was used by the British during WWI. This original M1909 is accessorized with modern HKS 25-5 speed loaders.

Air gun Trigger Revolver Gun barrel Wood


Smith & Wesson dominated the Law Enforcement market with their .38 Specials and .357 Magnum revolvers (Victory Model shown at top). Colt put in a good showing with their revolvers (1947 Transition Official Police .38 Special pictured middle). And in 1972, Sturm Ruger entered the LE market with revolvers like the Security-Six .357 Magnum (bottom).
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Metal


Double Action Revolvers remain one of the most dependable self-defense weapons. With practice (using bright colored snap-caps), target acquisition, trigger control, and reloading skills can be safely honed, and the double action revolver mastered.

Hopefully I've got my history straight. If not, I'm sure there are those on this forum who can correct it. My intention was to conduct a broad review of firearms history in an informative and entertaining way.
 

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Hey WG,

Very well done ............

Excellent pictures of Fine Firearms and accessories!! (wiping drool off keyboard, here)

Later, Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well... you've certainly found one place where the S&W Hand Ejector has not been forgotten... Just look at our new "what is it, when was it made, what's it worth" forum level of activity...
You would think Model 10s would be dirt cheep since there have been around six million of them made. But they are worth their weight in gold as "shooters".
 

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Gotta add a Mod 1899 here. Still shoots great after 120 years.




 

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There is a beauty in the simplicity of a working style weapon:



Our only example, so far. We would love to find a nice pencil barrel but they show up rarely at the shops here and with all going on I can't remember the last gun show.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There is a beauty in the simplicity of a working style weapon:



Our only example, so far. We would love to find a nice pencil barrel but they show up rarely at the shops here and with all going on I can't remember the last gun show.
When purpose and form are harmoniously wedded in a pleasing esthetics and deadly function, a handgun is a true piece of art!
 

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Nothing at all wrong with the 38 M&P and its descendants. I have a few and enjoy them all. Here is my 1955, pre model 10 with the grip adapter and the other is a 1905, 3rd change from about 1911
Revolver Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel

Air gun Trigger Revolver Gun barrel Wood

Here we have a 64-3 and a nickel plated 10-7. Both date to 1981 and were among the last of the pinned barrel guns as the pinned barrel was eliminated sometime in 1981.
Revolver Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood

Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Gun accessory
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Nothing at all wrong with the 38 M&P and its descendants. I have a few and enjoy them all. Here is my 1955, pre model 10 with the grip adapter and the other is a 1905, 3rd change from about 1911
View attachment 534594
View attachment 534595
Here we have a 64-3 and a nickel plated 10-7. Both date to 1981 and were among the last of the pinned barrel guns as the pinned barrel was eliminated sometime in 1981.
View attachment 534596
View attachment 534597
Oh My!!
 

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Quote from Will Ghormley – “Famously, Greg "Pappy” Boyington, WWII Marine Pilot ("Flying Leatherneck"), Medal of Honor winner, Ace Pilot credited with 28 kills, is known for shooting the lights out of the Officer' Club with the Victory Model he carried (no citations or awards issued for this engagement).”

My father met Boyington, got to know him, and Yes, he told my dad about that O-Club incident. Boyington was a hard charger, a butt kicker, and a heavy drinker, but an all-around good guy, and my dad and he got along well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Quote from Will Ghormley – “Famously, Greg "Pappy” Boyington, WWII Marine Pilot ("Flying Leatherneck"), Medal of Honor winner, Ace Pilot credited with 28 kills, is known for shooting the lights out of the Officer' Club with the Victory Model he carried (no citations or awards issued for this engagement).”

My father met Boyington, got to know him, and Yes, he told my dad about that O-Club incident. Boyington was a hard charger, a butt kicker, and a heavy drinker, but an all-around good guy, and my dad and he got along well.
It's awesome to have a story like that confirmed!
 
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