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The Appleseed Project is sponsored in full by the RWVA (Revolutionary War Veterans Association) The Appleseed Program is designed to take you from being a simple rifle owner to being a true rifleman.
The Appleseed Project is put on by local gun/rifle ranges across the entire country and numerous times per year at most locations. Go to the link below to check event scheduling in your area.

All Women and children under 21 shoot for free.

I am attaching links to help you access the information directly connected to this project There are no blind links or pop-ups here.

To get the latest schedules and information:
Home page for the Appleseed project: http://www.appleseedinfo.org/index.htm

Current 2009 & 2010 Appleseed events scheduled: http://www.appleseedinfo.org/as_schedule2.php

General Questions and answers here: http://www.appleseedinfo.org/as_faq.htm

The Appleseed Program is designed to take you from being a simple rifle owner to being a true rifleman. All throughout American history, the rifleman has been defined as a “marksman capable of hitting a man-sized target from 500 yards away — no ifs, ands or buts about it”. This 500-yard range is traditionally known as "the rifleman's quarter-mile;" a rifleman can hit just about any target he can see. This skill was particularly evident in the birth of our country, and was the difference in winning the Revolutionary War.

What's a rifleman?
In short, a rifleman is an armed American, trained in the tradition of American Liberty. It's a man who has learned to shoot a rifle accurately — accurate enough to score "expert" on the Army Qualification Course. Until you can do that, you're considered a "Cook," unprepared and unqualified to carry a rifle on the firing line of freedom. But after attending an Appleseed AQT shoot, you'll have the credentials necessary to be a true rifleman, and will understand the critical need for defending freedom in this country.
The RWVA is dedicated to the Appleseed Program and encourages every American to learn to shoot.

Please keep in mind that All women shoot FREE at Appleseed events, as well as all children under 21.

Please note: The fee for 2009 Appleseed Events is unchanged from last year:
Advanced registration: $45 a day or $70 for the weekend.
"Pay at the door" fees: $50 a day or $80 for the weekend.

Participants may be required to pay a range fee to be collected by the range.

Check the information link to determine if there will be an additional range fee.
Check information link 48 hours prior to the event for any last minute information.
Cancellations: 1 weeks notice is required for refund.
Pre-registration is important. 100+ shooters are expected at each event, with a full team of RWVA instructors.

This schedule changes and is updated regularly. If you see your city listed keep an eye on the page and additional dates may be added as it is updated.
If your city is not on this list you can contact your local shooting range and inquire if they would be interested in joining the group.

The RWVA has a forum you can join to better understand, and join in on the discussions of its purpose and results. http://www.appleseedinfo.org/smf/index.php

My wife and I personally recommend the RWVA Appleseed Program to everybody interested in learning how to properly shoot and use a rifle. The program is for every level of rifle user. From the absolute beginner to the seasoned hunter. This program is a living history lesson about the revolutionary war rifleman as well.
There are awards, qualification patches and tee shirts available to shooters for their accomplishments while at the shoot. This will improve your shooting skills, rifle handling methods and your attitudes on proper rifle usage.
If at all possible the full 2 days will accomplish the best results. Plan to attend for the entire weekend if you can.

The Appleseed Project is an ideal family event to share the love of the shooting sport.
All ages are welcome as long as they can understand and follow direction and training.
Thanks for your interest, this project can only make us better riflemen and riflewomen.
 

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I just put a set of Tech-Sights on my 10/22. The Appleseed info was in the package. I'll be researching a local event. Sounds like time well spent and fun to boot.
 

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The 25m AQT is a simulated distance target that are the same size in your sight picture as man-sized targets at the actual distances.

Stage 1: One simulated 100 yard target, one mag, 10 rounds, 2 minutes, firing from standing.

Stage 2: Two simulated 200 yard targets; mags of 2 and 8, 5 and 5 in the targets, 55 seconds, start standing, shoot seated or kneeling.

Stage 3: Three simulated 300 yard targets, mags of 2 and 8, 3 3 4 in the targets, 65 seconds, start standing, shoot prone.

Stage 4: Four simulated 400 yard targets, one mag, 10 rounds, 2 2 3 3 in the targets, 5 minutes, shoot prone (this stage counts double).

To score Expert and get the Rifleman's patch, you need to score 210 or higher.


You can also qualify on the full distance AQT at ranges where we shoot it ... a true man-sized target at each distance is used. The COF is the same, except that there is only one target at each distance, so no target transitions are required.

Sometimes 100 yard AQT is done where one fires at 25, 50, 75, and 100 yards on an appropriately-sized target... you can qualify on this as well. This allows .22 shooters to experience just about the same amount of trajectory compensation that is required for a center fire rifle on the full 400 yard AQT.
 

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rifleman-patch.jpg
 

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Appleseed-patches.jpg
 

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appleseed-logo.gif Events for the State of Oklahoma

Norman, Okla. October 28, 2017 - October 29, 2017
 

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I attended Appleseed in Ramseur, NC where the program was founded. It is a good program.

Later, I helped put on an Appleseed shoot in Wilmington, NC with a friend that was one of their instructors.

Sometime after that, my friend left the program - so i have not had further contact.

I think that the best things about Appleseed are:


  • A sense of reverence for the M1 Garand battle rifle
  • A practical reminder of the importance of citizen soldiers in American history
  • Confirmation of why we have the Second Amendment
 

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What caliber rifles do they shoot? A 10/22? AR-15? Hmmm?

Hmmm...I shot "Marksman" at rifle quals in the Army? I also have a Combat Infantry Award?
cib_fi11.gif
 

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Combat Infantry Badge Information

I. DESCRIPTION

A silver and enamel badge 1 inch in height and 3 inches in width, consisting of an infantry musket on a light blue bar with a silver border, on and over an elliptical oak wreath. Stars are added at the top of the wreath to indicate subsequent awards; one star for the second award, two stars for the third award and three stars for the fourth award.

II. SYMBOLISM

The bar is blue, the color associated with the Infantry branch. The musket is adapted from the Infantry insignia of branch and represents the first official U.S. shoulder arm, the 1795 model Springfield Arsenal musket. It was adopted as the official Infantry branch insignia in 1924. The oak symbolizes steadfastness, strength and loyalty.

III. AWARD ELIGIBILITY

Awarded to personnel in the grade of Colonel or below with an infantry or special forces military occupational specialty who have satisfactorily performed duty while assigned as a member of an infantry/special forces unit, brigade or smaller size, during any period subsequent to 6 December 1941 when the unit was engaged in active ground combat. The policy was expanded to permit award to Command Sergeants Major of infantry battalions or brigades, effective 1 December 1967. Specific criteria for each conflict was also established. Only one award is authorized for service in Vietnam, Laos, the Dominican Republic, Korea (subsequent to 4 January 1969), El Salvador, Grenada, Panama, the Southwest Asia and Somalia, regardless of whether an individual has served in one or more of these areas. The complete criteria for each area and inclusive dates are listed in Army Regulation 600-8-22.

IV. DATE APPROVED

The Combat Infantryman Badge was approved by the Secretary of War on 7 October 1943 and announced in War Department Circular 269 dated 27 October 1943. On 8 February 1952, the Chief of Staff, Army, approved a proposal to add stars to the Combat Infantryman Badge to indicate award of the badge in separate wars. Under this change in policy, the badge was no longer limited to a one-time award, but could now be awarded to eligible individuals for each war in which they participated.

V. SUBDUED BADGES

Subdued badges are authorized in metal and cloth. The metal badge has a black finish. The cloth badge has olive green base cloth with the rifle, wreath, stars and border of the bar embroidered in black.

VI. MINIATURE BADGES

A dress miniature badge, 1 1/4 inches in length is authorized for wear on the mess uniforms. A miniature badge, 1 3/4 inches is also authorized in lieu of the regular size badge.
 
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