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It was October 1986, I was on my first Wyoming Mule Deer hunt, after relocating to Wyoming the previous year.

It was the last day of the season, I was idling along on a “two track” on a bitterly cold morning just before sunrise.

Apparently I had picked a poor area to hunt, as my deer sitings were few and far apart, and here I am on the last day of the season about to “eat my tags”.....when it happened! A “spike” Mule Deer jumped from behind some brush and rocks into the two-track, about 30 yards in front of me. I jumped from the truck, quickly shoving my gloved hand into my right pocket to retrieve a cartridge for my Winchester Model 70 .375 H&H.

As I jerked the bolt back on my rifle, simultaneously trying to put the retrieved cartridge into the action......I realized that, I was getting ready to load a tube of Chapstick! Upon the discovery, I quickly threw the Chapstick across the truck.....switching the rifle to my right hand. Quickly reaching into my left pocket for a “real” cartridge, I then switched the rifle back to my left hand, cartridge to right hand, completed the loading, getting off a hasty shot, as the deer had seen enough and was hastily leaving .....”Exit stage right”!

I bullet struck the deer behind the last rib, shot thru the liver....the deer made a short sprint, circling and falling on the two track about 15 yards behind me!

My fist Wyoming Mule Deer hunt ended with a “dinky” little spike buck......and a lasting memory!

Now, to attempt to explain the Chapstick “snafu”! This was my first year hunting, and I wanted to be in total compliance with Wyoming hunting laws. It was my understanding that, the rifle must be empty of cartridges, while in the vehicle. When in reality......the chamber must be “Empty” when the firearm is in the vehicle.

This is just one of many stories that I could tell on myself......perhaps a chapter in the book I write! memtb
 

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Better safe than sorry with game laws and the Possum Sheriff, especially when hunting out of state. We are pretty laid back here in Kansas with Loaded guns in Vehicles. We always tell our Hunter Education Students that guns should be empty in Vehicles.
Having taught Hunter Ed for almost 40 years, I have told the below story many times, about a student at my High School.

One cold morning a student brought a late 60's early 70's vintage Chevy truck to our Auto Mechanics class that was hemorrhaging fuel from the fuel tank, located behind the seat.
He was pretty shook, but I am not sure what bugged him most, dammed near shooting himself, the damage to the truck or the thought of having to tell his Dad what happened.
As it turns out the student had a deer rifle, 3030 lever gun, loaded in the truck, barrel up, and he said that he bumped the gun with the floor mounted 4 speed shift handle, and it went off. Apparently it was cocked too??

Our old Auto shop teacher had seen about everything, that a kid could pull off, and did not get too excited. Some of us pulled the tank out of the truck, out on the parking lot, and he cleaned the area, and Soldered a copper penny over the 30 cal bullet hole, that went through both sides of the tank.
The bullet passed through the seat back, both sides of the tank, the back of the cab, the front of the bed, and out through the top of the cross bed tool box. Where it went from there is not known. Also unknown is exactly how he explained the holes in the truck to his Dad, or how much skin was damaged on his rear, or if he still transports loaded guns in his truck.

Good news is that for some reason his girlfriend was not sitting in the center, beside him, as was the norm.
 
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