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I've seen the diamonds and the wedges for single hunters. Seriously considering ordering this one from North West Traders. Great price and with all the additional tie downs you can make it work as more then just a tarp-tent. I could use it for Rendevous or just trekking. Unless somebody talks me out of it...I think this is the....

Grail Tent :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzJHuWlEAtk


giz
 

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So lesseee..... Heavy Canvas, Steel Stakes and a 26oz Hatchet. I'll bet that "Survivorman" in the video didn't 'trek' that very far..... maybe from his Xterra to the campsite. ;)

I'm sure that those rotten tamarac poles would stand up well in a heavy wind and the mosquitos will sure appreciate the lack of a bug fly. No floor? No problem..... ticks need to eat too.....

Looks like a neat kid's backyard tent, but I think Giz that you could do a little better.
 

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As Drew has said.....No floor, prepare to sleep "wet" on the cold (and wet) ground. Also, to get "crawley things" inside as well. They like to be warm and dry, too!! :roll:

There ain't no mosquitos or black flies in Maine :lol: so, you don't you won't miss the netting, one bit! Backwoodsmen don't bathe very often, so that "natural repellent" keeps the bugs (and other people) away.

Good idea, Giz. I think you should "go for it". :lol:
(Keep the camper close by. ;) ) Bob
 
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Sebago Son said:
So lesseee..... Heavy Canvas, Steel Stakes and a 26oz Hatchet. I'll bet that "Survivorman" in the video didn't 'trek' that very far..... maybe from his Xterra to the campsite. ;)

quote]

Drew and Bob K,

Interesting opinions boys, you guys do know who the guy in the video is :mrgreen:

Here's another of his video's...on how to keep warm with just a wool blanket....pretty good stuff, ...enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gx38go8- ... re=channel

And Drew, always give the newbies dry tamarack to burn for their fire...just pitch your tent a good ways away from theirs... Old Mainers trick and a good one. Tamarack sends more sparks into the air then just about anything. They'll be up all night trying to stop their tent from catching fire.... :mrgreen:

Here's another tent of his, that I'm considerin'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9xbCrcM ... re=channel


giz
 

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Well, a good wool blanket weighs about four pounds, give or take. But, you know what? I wouldn't go anywhere without one. Not even the desert when the temperatures are in the triple digits. You'd be surprized how cold it gets 'long about 3 A.M.

Never seen anyone wrap up like that, though. A bear might think you was a "pig-in-a-blanket." Or, maybe a burrito. He just might send his mate out for some re-fried beans and some salsa. :lol:

You might check out the Baker tents, too. They can be found at the same web address above.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
QC, .... :mrgreen:

I do like the Baker tent. Seen quite a few in use and they are pretty nice! I'm looking for lightweight and have even considered a Foresters tent. Funny how the old ones had all these different designs. There were the Wall Tents, the Bakers, the Diamonds, the Wedges, the Whelens', the Sutler trade tents, double enders, single enders, and on and on....

Something they all relied on was a ability to reflect the heat of a fire into the tent. Something lacking in most of the modern designs. Wool blankets and what they called blanket strips were another thing. Point blankets are a whole nother subject... ;)

All the tents had the ability to have a mud flap added to them, and any that I order will most likely be in that style. The tentmakers don't charge much for them. Add a small groundcloth and you are chrome...

giz
 

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Gizamo said:
Sebago Son said:
Here's another of his video's...on how to keep warm with just a wool blanket....pretty good stuff, ...enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gx38go8- ... re=channel

giz
How to use a blanket... yup.... neat.

Sure makes it tough to get a litte pup tent love.... that's my favorite way to keep warm in the woods.

Reminds me of something I heard Wayne Bosowicz say when he was asked by some 'sport' about how to use his 'hunter's scent masking soap'.... Scowling the Big Guy muttered "... if you need directions on how to use a bar of soap then you shouldn't be in the woods alone with a gun...."
 

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Why pack a heavy tarp when you can pack a chunk of visqueen or a cheap light weight tarp from walmart.
Why pack steel stakes when there are hundreds of them growing all around you.
Why pack a heavy hatchet when there are rocks in the woods to drive stakes.
Why try to sleep wrapped up like a burrito in a thin wool blanket when you could just pack a light weight sleeping bag.
Why wake up the morning or middle of the night feeling like you have severe arthritus and your ninety years when you could have piled about six inches of bows under your ground cloth and slept in comfort.
Have you looked into a good burrow that can help carry all the massive weight you going to have in your pack loading it up with stuff like this.
 

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That looks like a good trail tent - with light, simple, and quick-to set-up being best qualities for a trail tent.

For a more permanent camp, I prefer the Baker because I can use a cot in one of those to elevate my old carcass off the ground and away from the rainwater that always accumulates in my tent.
http://www.cdamuzzleloaders.org/baker_tent.htm
I've spent many nights in a Baker tent and they are fine for cooler weather when the skeeters are gone. A small one is great for two cots and a dog in between. Also, you can stow your rifle and gear underneath your cot.

Here's a Whelen-style lean to:
http://www.cdamuzzleloaders.org/lean_to.htm
Looks like it might be harder to set up than yours.

Diamond Brand made millions of great heavy-duty canvas packs and tents for the Boy Scouts, the US Army, and the USMC and I believe they're still making canvas tents in North Carolina:
http://www.hiltonstentcity.com/library/db-tents.htm

xtm
 
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xtm....

They don't get it yet...guess I'll have to give then a clue so they have to think out of the box.... ;)

The gear isn't heavy at all if you know how to use a tumpline under a wannigan... :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

giz
 

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Giz the best thing you can do instead of asking people in here who have experience in what your wanting to do is to keep watching that guy on you tube and load your pack board up with your wannigan and hook your tumpline around your forhead and head for the woods.
 

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Isnt that the truth. I had to look up a wannigan and laughed so hard when I found out what they are. The tumpline I knew what was.They dont help much and are of no use with a pack board.
Some times it is best to just shut up and let a person learn on there there own.A big heavy pack full of unessasary gear will do it in a hurry to.
 
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Guys,

It doesn't matter how much the stuff weighs...it's for a canoe camping trip :mrgreen:

giz
 

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Well that was a mean trick Giz.Playing your self off as squirely suckered me right in.I had done lost hope in you.Once you convinced me you were goofy it seemed bizzare you would carry a wooden box made for a canoe on your back but what the hell. The guy is squirely was my thoughts.
Well I need to go adjust my muffler bearings on my pickup and put in a new pheazer.I gotta pick up some wooden welding rods also so I can attach my rubber baby buggy bumpers to my Harley.I misplaced my rubber nuematic left handed monkey wrench some where and I need it for adjusting them muffler bearings.
 

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Canoe's have weight limits, too!!! :roll: Get into the 21st Century, Giz! Nylon tents and sleeping bags rated for below 32 degrees, is the way to go. Old-time woodsmen usually had some "jack-azz" to carry the heavy stuff! :lol: Bob
 

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The hunting outfitters I'm familiar with still use canvas cabin tents - not nylon cabin tents. It's part of the experience......so what if someone wants to do it the old way.

Heading off on a trek with mid-19th century clothing, gear, and firearms - and then sleeping in a bright red 21st century nylon tent might tend to diminish the total experience of stepping back into the past to see what it was like, if only for just a few days..... :)

Sort of like showing up at a CAS event all dressed out in the period western duds and holster rig..... with a 9mm Glock, and whining that the 9mm cartridge is over 100 years old and should therefore be allowed.

I'm with Giz on this one - except that I want a cot to get off the ground. I get mighty tired of being told "Newer is Better." and that so much of my perfectly good stuff is obsolete. I am being told de facto that I am obsolete. #$%& 'em! I am happy...

xtm
 
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Sometimes the old ways are pretty fine, indeed.
I'm going up north this coming weekend to look at some gear that an old timer re-enactor has. He's no longer doing it, but started many years ago. He has a brazier for sale. Have to say that I've only seen a couple of them in use, but they make so much sense that I've wanted one, ever since...

Guess everyone could argue that making fire from a flint and steel over a charcloth is foolish, when you can just whip out a bic lighter :mrgreen: But that isn't what I am going for. Same goes for cooking over a fire pit. Guess a Optimus stove is more efficient, but you have to carry that and the fuel for it, don't you...

I'm sure this seems pretty odd to some. But I've done the long adventure hikes, climbed mountains until my late 40's (mostly with my wife), done the high altitude thing , spent many nights in stone huts on top of mountains ~ all with modern gear. Bet I've spent alot more time out in the winter elements then most folks could imagine. I've trained for winter rescue with some pretty good folks. Winter camped...

This is more like another adjustment in the experience then the equipment. As I get older, the more I'm interested in the ways of the past....
Guess you'd have to try it to appreciate it.

giz
 

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Giz, I busted your chops a little, but you know I'm with you.... my heart longs for the old days & old ways even if my fossilized carcass won't let me get away with it much anymore....

Still, at least once or twice a year I get out with the boys and we slip out for a little canoe camping under the stars (no tent even) on the shores of the big lake and for a few moments I can ignore the Coleman Cooler and pretend it's 1890.... A hearty Shore Breakfast, and lots of fishing and horseplay particularly if all the boys are there....



Waking up to a Sebago Sunrise like this is worth a sore back and a dew soaked butt in the morning....



The Rosy Fingers of Dawn....

 
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