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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title states....probably a stupid question here. I have two 1903A3 Springfields. I store them in my gun safe without the bolts. I set the bolts on the self in the safe together. Well I got them mixed up....do not know for sure which bolt goes to which assigned rifle. I assume it will not hurt anything if the bolts are switch on the rifles?
Check with you guys to be just on the safe side.........I checked serial numbers and all but nothing tells me for sure perkgfn
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
To be safe.....going to get the headspace checked in one rifle. Believe the I got the correct bolts for the right rifle.....but just need to be sure...
 

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You'll either need to get headspace gauges or find a gunsmith that can check it for you on each rifle with bolt installed. I have the .30-06 gauges if you're ever near my area.

Go and No-Go are used when cutting the chamber, but the Field gauge confirms that the gun remains safe. A bolt should never close on a field gauge. If a bolt closes on a "field" gauge, the rifle is not safe to shoot.

You may find that both will properly not close on a field gauge, but that one fits better than the other. That's where the no-go / go gauges may help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
You'll either need to get headspace gauges or find a gunsmith that can check it for you on each rifle with bolt installed. I have the .30-06 gauges if you're ever near my area.

Go and No-Go are used when cutting the chamber, but the Field gauge confirms that the gun remains safe. A bolt should never close on a field gauge. If a bolt closes on a "field" gauge, the rifle is not safe to shoot. checked.

You may find that both will properly not close on a field gauge, but that one fits better than the other. That's where the no-go / go gauges may help.
Thanks..... I have been on YouTube on checking headspace. Yeah....better head to a gunsmith and get them checked. Thought about buying the gauges...
I'm 99.9% sure I got the correct bolts on the rifles but I will not take a chance.....

Found this on using Okie Headspace Gauages but understand just used on rimmed cases

https://youtu.be/4CbjuHPq90U

How far is Raleigh from Boone? My son is moving to Boone
 

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I would get the rifles head spaced with the bolts to get the right match-ups.

I had a similar situation in my safes with my bolt rifles. Like you, I have some duplicate rifles, so keeping the parts matching with the correct gun, I needed to find a solution. I ended taking a lesson from my gunsmith. I asked him once how he kept all of the gun parts he handled from getting mixed up. He said he bags and tags each part as they com off the guns, and puts string tags on every bolt. So now I have a string tag attached and hanging on everyone of my bolts. I wrote the Rifles make, model number, and serial number on each tag so I wouldn't get them messed up.
I also do the same with my rifle scopes.

Regards,
Gregory
 

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I would think that the bolts should be numbered to the guns when constructed, if it were that critical for them functioning properly....but I don't know much about bolt guns.
 

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Paul, Boone is in the Mountains (a beautiful area) about 4 hours from Raleigh. I get up there every year visiting a friend's home nearby.
 
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Paul, good question. Not stupid at all.
 
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The stupid question is the one you didn't ask. Hillbilly headspace gauge: cut a piece of business card & put it on the base of a cartridge, then try & close the bolt... it should close very hard or not @ all. If it closes easily it needs checking w/ a better, more accurate gauge. The bolt that fits tightest is the one to use in that action. Now having said all that don't be surprised if both show excessive headspace, it's halfway common in old military rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The stupid question is the one you didn't ask. Hillbilly headspace gauge: cut a piece of business card & put it on the base of a cartridge, then try & close the bolt... it should close very hard or not @ all. If it closes easily it needs checking w/ a better, more accurate gauge. The bolt that fits tightest is the one to use in that action. Now having said all that don't be surprised if both show excessive headspace, it's halfway common in old military rifles.
Injunbro...I assume I still have to take out the firing pin and take the extactor off the bolt? may try this....just to see what it reads....
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would get the rifles head spaced with the bolts to get the right match-ups.

I had a similar situation in my safes with my bolt rifles. Like you, I have some duplicate rifles, so keeping the parts matching with the correct gun, I needed to find a solution. I ended taking a lesson from my gunsmith. I asked him once how he kept all of the gun parts he handled from getting mixed up. He said he bags and tags each part as they com off the guns, and puts string tags on every bolt. So now I have a string tag attached and hanging on everyone of my bolts. I wrote the Rifles make, model number, and serial number on each tag so I wouldn't get them messed up.
I also do the same with my rifle scopes.

Regards,
Gregory
Oh I learned my Lesson....the bolts will be identified ....LOL
 

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Injunbro...I assume I still have to take out the firing pin and take the extactor off the bolt? may try this....just to see what it reads....


No, use a fired case in the house or do it w/ a safe backstop (I keep forgetting everyone doesn't have a range).
 
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