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I’ve read a time or two here and elsewhere people suggesting that you can prep and prime your cases and then store them back for a later loading session. Question is, how much later and stored how? I’ve used some ‘06 cases that were primed and stored for a couple of years in a coffee can. I’ve (carefully) decamped such when taken from cartridge boxes but of unknown storage age — the brass had begun to turn black with green highlights!
So what is the rule of thumb or is there one for storing primed brass as opposed to keeping the primers in their isolation package?
thanks in advance.
 

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I have fired surplus 30-06 ammo (a few years back) that was 40+ years old. Every cartridge went Bang. I am real sure it was not stored in heated/cooled warehouses. Some brass was dull brown, but no corrosion. After tumbling several hours, the brass was in excellent condition for reloading.

I believe based on personal experience, that primed brass can be stored in pristine condition, IF the storage containers are air tight. When the container is closed / sealed shut, there is a finite amount of oxygen trapped inside. That oxygen will react with the brass to make a certain level of tarnish (loss of shine) and the process stops. I have brass (8+ years since tumbled, resized, primed) in my detached garage that is as shiny as the day it went on the shelf (closed US military ammo can) or dull brass color (Zip Lock storage bag). In contrast for the last 3 weeks, I have had 2 boxes of ammo holding down the table cloth on the back deck table. That brass is "light" brown without a hint of shine on it. The ammo looks like it is 10 years old, not 3 weeks since it was tumbled and reloaded. Four boxes sitting on my reloading bench looks like it was just reloaded, shiny and bright.
 

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When I reloaded my pistol ammo on a single stage, I did exactly what you were saying - I deprimed, reprimed and flared the cases for the first go-round; later when I needed ammo, I dropped powder and seated and crimped in the next go-round. Keep things in a cool dry place and all is well.
 
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Been building 308 hunting rounds for a while now from brass I sized and bumper the shoulders back on and then primed and out in a Cabelas plastic ammo can. Must be close to a thousand in there and I keep using them. Think I prepped them all about 7 years ago. All are just fine.

Did the same with 223's. I have thousands (literally) already loaded and in 500 count boxes, but I have primed and sized 223 cases stored the same way, probably another thousand or so as well.

They stay in my armory, upstairs in the house. No garage, no basement storage
 

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I did a similar thing when I shot NRA High Power competition. In the Winter, in Columbus, OH we all prep’d our 7.62 brass by the thousands. Took each case through a lengthy “ match-prep” process that went through priming. The Primed “ match-prep’d” cases were simply stored inside the house with heat and A/C. Powder and bullet added as needed through the season.
Never had a problem. I believe the key is maintaining climate controlled storage, not stacking them in a garage or outdoor shed.
 

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I actually keep all my loaded rounds in the garage, in US Surplus 50 cal ammo cans with gasketed lids and cam lock handles but then my garage is heated and air conditioned as well.
 

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I have thousands of .38 Spl., .357 Mag., 41, .44 Spl and Mag and .45 Colt resized, flared and primed stored in the red plastic Folgers coffee cans. They may sit for years before I load them and move them to the ammo cans where I store live rounds.
As the guys said, if the primers aren’t exposed to extremes of heat and cold they’ll last for decades and still fire when struck.

Stay safe.
 
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