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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Good morning all. I started down the "dark path" LOL of buying a "few" revolvers to save as an inheritance for my son. What started as a few guns has caused me to buy a larger safe. In order to protect these, I of course have them oiled and wrapped. Has anyone tried vacuum sealing guns? I of course keep their boxes separately.

In theory, once cleaned and oiled they would not have to be touched again until the package is opened.

Since this hobby can put you in the poor house, I have decided to stick with magnums. (no I don't have a registered or non registered magnum yet lol) I have some a a mix of 19s, 27s, 28s and 29s. Oh yeah I have one Python. None will ever be shot!

I have guns I shoot. Just not these.

I have been fortunate enough to meet a couple of very smart "advisors" to minimize mistakes.


So far, this has been an adventure!
 

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Looks like you have recently joins us, so if I have not welcomed you already... WELCOME!

Probably would work, but I have never tried it. Sorry but I cant really offer much intelligent commentary...
As long as they were wrapped and oiled it would seem to keep moisture out. Not sure how temp changes would work?
No air, no sweating when going cold to hot? I just dont know...
My gut feeling just tells me that this would be a bad idea.. I follow my instincts most times, with pretty good success.;
 
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Welcome to the forums from the cotton and peanut covered plains of the Wiregrass! Yes, some gun owners have vacuum sealed their guns for long term storage. I haven't but I have used Strike Hold which should protect a gun for a long period without sealing it. It bonds with the metal and is hydrophobic. As long as water can't get to the metal, it won't rust. Check out their videos. They are quite impressive.
 
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I think you’ve done the right things for storage. Do you have something like a Golden Rod in your safe to help keep moisture low? As you mentioned, no storage in the boxes. But also, don’t use holsters for storage-they can trap moisture. Leather, of course, has acids used in the tanning process , as do the paper boxes. I haven’t tried the vacuum sealing. Seems like it should work, but I’m with BES on that. Just doesn’t strike me as a good idea. My cent and a half! Hank
 

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I don't believe in sealing firearms like that. I suppose for long term preservation it will work if there is no moisture within the sealed package, and the package itself does not deteriorate from contact with the chemicals or lubricant you use. But all polymers are at risk for that.

The military used a very thick waxy petroleum material Cosmoline for preservation. It's awful to remove, but does preserve firearms and their stock. I would not recommend it.

I use silicone impregnated socks within gun rugs inside a safe equipped with an electric dehumidification "stick". I live in a moderately humid area in the SouthEast and the safes are within an air conditioned space. So far, no problems with corrosion. This allows me to periodically inspect and lubricate the firearms.

All lubricants will eventually dry. You may find that after long term storage, you have solidified lubricant inside the firearm that will be difficult to remove. I doubt you'd want to deal with that.
 
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My background is in museology, so I have a very particular perspective here. The National Firearms Museum has a handbook on curating and storing firearms at http://www.nramuseum.org/media/1007361/caring for your collectible firearms by doug wicklund.pdf. Since their main interest is storing them with minimal damage to time and environment they offer excellent advice. Some points I would like to raise that people seldom think of are storage containers. There is acid-free paper available and acid-free cardboard boxes that will help keep contaminants away. For my own Long-term storage (5 years at most so far) I clean pistols and give them a light coat of microcrystalline wax — no oil. Then vacuum seal them with a silica gel pack and a food-grade oxygen absorbent NOT in direct contact with the wood or metal. This is for extreme condition storage of a pistol that will probably not be handled again for another 10 years or more. For more rational storage at mid term the NF Museum suggests Renaissance wax.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would like to thank everyone for the responses. I may be overthinking this whole thing. My safe is in my home which obviously is "climate" controlled. I also have humidity control inside the safe.

Sounds like I should be good if I just oil and wrap. Just trying to be careful with these investments.

Thanks
 

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I am mainly a dry storage kind of guy... and I've had remarkably good luck over 4+ decades. In fact, the only guns I've ever had trouble with were wet-stored (oiled and packed away) so I never do that anymore. The key, I think is good climate control. I have never stored a gun in a basement or in any sort of wet or corrosive environment. I monitor the gun room constantly for temperature and humidity with highly accurate instruments. So far, so good. (y)
 
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