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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK, so 2 guns to talk about, both have similar situations. I recall the exactly right thread about this about 2 months ago, but just cannot find it in the search pages. Like an idiot I should have printed it off.

First the 586 no-dash.

It fires .38 Specials all day no issue - at least none the 5-6 cylinders I fired through it.
It fires about 1 to 1.5 cylinders of .357 Mag then locks up - like it's frozen. Trigger is stuck, Hammer is stuck, and cylinder will not rotate. Just a little teeny weeny itsy bitsy wiggle and that's all. After about 5 minutes cooling off, it loosened up, gradually, and now it works again. Put another cylinder of .38 through it no issue.
Ejector star was always flush with back of cylinder.
Took it apart as far as it would go - no crap under ejector star... but when reassembled after cleaning I could see no light between cylinder and forcing cone. No end shake or wiggle of any sort before cocking, and just the slightest wiggle - barely noticeable, when cocked. Operates very smoothly!! But clearances seem really tight.

Tried disassembling the ejection rod, used 'Bro's trick with clamping wood around the knob - it will not budge, just shreds the wood! Presume this is a lefty tighty righty loosey thread? It's 1984 vintage. Knob has very tiny serrations, so not sure what will grip it shy of metal to metal (gahhhh!!!) contact. Wood was soft pine - do I need white oak instead?

Thoughts?

Second question on it being a no-dash.... I understand there was a factory hammer nose bushing mod - how can I tell if this was done? I do not see an "M" or a star on the butt anywhere, even under the grips.

Second pistol: 27-2

It simply gets tighter and tighter to open the cylinder after firing a few cylinders. 1973 vintage. IIRC this is what that thread was all about. I have not opened this one up. Anyone remember what the fix was? IIRC Gearchecker or InjunBro had the fix towards the end of the thread. Just getting too old and decrepit to remember the details...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The “M” stamp for fixed 586/686 revolvers is on the frame where the model number is stamped
So this didn't get the fix. What were the symptoms of needing the fix?
 

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After firing either gun you should have some carbon and depending upon chosen projectile possibly some lead or burned on lube deposited on the face of the cylinder. Anyway with the gun dirty look carefully at the face of the cylinder after you get it open. You want to look for shiny spots or scuffing of the build up of stuff. This indicates that the barrel/cylinder gap is too tight. Many folks think .002 - .004 is the sign of a well built gun. I have found this to be way too tight for shooting lead or for shooting more than 5 or 10 rounds at a range session. Between the expansion from heat and the fouling build up on the face of the cylinder the gun will lock up. When you take it home it has cooled off then you clean it and look for a problem but now all the evidence is gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After firing either gun you should have some carbon and depending upon chosen projectile possibly some lead or burned on lube deposited on the face of the cylinder. Anyway with the gun dirty look carefully at the face of the cylinder after you get it open. You want to look for shiny spots or scuffing of the build up of stuff. This indicates that the barrel/cylinder gap is too tight. Many folks think .002 - .004 is the sign of a well built gun. I have found this to be way too tight for shooting lead or for shooting more than 5 or 10 rounds at a range session. Between the expansion from heat and the fouling build up on the face of the cylinder the gun will lock up. When you take it home it has cooled off then you clean it and look for a problem but now all the evidence is gone.
Being a nickel plated gun, there are the usual scorch marks clearly visible on the cylinder front. When I took the yoke off i didn't notice any scuffing of the scorches. Not that they weren't there, they still are (couldn't find the Flitz) but they were even and solid (meaning the pattern around the cylinder holes was distinct, almost like it was blued in). The .357s were soft point jacketed, the .38s LRN. Next time I'll have to look for any lead around the forcing cone. When cleaning it, I didn't notice any - or very little - certainly not enough to jam up the works.
 

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Sounds like the same problem I had with 2 model 19’s I looked at but passed on after test firing. It was the hammer nose bushing and the spent .357 primers would have mushroomed just enough to hang up, .38 special was not a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sounds like the same problem I had with 2 model 19’s I looked at but passed on after test firing. It was the hammer nose bushing and the spent .357 primers would have mushroomed just enough to hang up, .38 special was not a problem.
And as the cases cooled off, they allowed just enough room to operate the cylinder... makes sense! Thanks!!
 

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Hmm it's an older gun, with no end shake?

My first guess is unless you're the original owner likely someone put a shim under the ejector rod to get rid of the end shake, and basically over shimmed it. You need .001 of end shake for most guns to run. A gun with zero end shake will feel very tight, it will feel great in fact but it will generally jam in 10-50 rounds depending on the ammo.

Possibly someone did that on both guns. That would be the very first thing I would check.

Pretty unusual that your BC gap is so tight that the gun is freezing itself. That requires about a .002 BC gap on most guns, nearly unheard of. My guns with .003 to .004 BC gaps will run 500+ rounds of filthy lead before they get draggy. I mean, its possible. If that's the case, it's a very easy fix, maybe 10-15 minutes for a gunsmith, or you can rent a barrel facing tool from one of those on line reamer places.

Can you pull the cylinder to the rear to get a visible BC gap?

The ejector rod is reverse threaded. Best thing is a drill press, if you have one, just clamp it down in the chuck.

Good luck!
 
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