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That's exciting news... I think Marlin will be done right by Ruger.
 

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Very nice to see. Lots of memories with my grandfather's Marlin. Wish I had it.
 
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The question is how they will manufacture the future Marlin rifles?

Clearly, Marlin has a running factory for parts fabrication and assembly. Ten years ago they closed the North Haven, Connecticut plant and moved operations to the Remington factories in New York and Kentucky.

Also note that Marlin purchased Harrington and Richardson 20 years ago. I expect that brand and the designs come with the deal.

Just saw that Ruger included this in their announcement:

"The transaction is exclusively for the Marlin Firearms assets. Remington firearms, ammunition, other Remington Outdoor brands, and all facilities and real estate are excluded from the Ruger purchase. Once the purchase is completed, the Company will begin the process of relocating the Marlin Firearms assets to existing Ruger manufacturing facilities."

The production move of the Marlin models is likely to go to existing Ruger factories like Mayoden, NC. (also Prescott, Arizona; Newport, New Hampshire; Northport, Connecticut).

As they move to the existing Ruger facilities, it's logical that they will start using their own fabrication (Pine Tree Castings) which uses investment casting technology rather than forging.

Once things settle down, I'll ask next time I'm with Ruger people...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The last I had heard, the Mayoden, NC facility was only being about 60% used. The equipment that Remington got when they originally bought Marlin was really old and pretty much all used up. their engineers spent a couple years getting all the specs for the 336 series and a couple of others converted to modern CNC code. As everyone probably knows, the stuff they put out in the first couple years after buying Marlin, was fairly spotty as far as QC. They finally got most of the bugs worked out just in time for Ruger to benefit from their efforts
 

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As they move to the existing Ruger facilities, it's logical that they will start using their own fabrication (Pine Tree Castings) which uses investment casting technology rather than forging.
People on various other forums have been freaking out at the prospect of Marlins being built with investment cast parts, instead of forged. I personally do not understand the angst, if there is one outfit that knows how to do it right, it's Ruger.

Engine blocks, pistons, and jet engine turbine compressor blades... are among the things that are being investment cast. I can't think of a harsher, more demanding application than a jet compressor blade, and Pine Tree Castings (Ruger) makes them.

In the many decades of making firearms via investment casting, and the hundreds of million of firearms made and sold by Ruger, has anyone heard of a failure attributed to an investment cast frame? Blackhawks will handle loads that will lead to a rapid disassembly of a S&W.

I won't be concerned about the future of Marlin manufacturing with Ruger, I'm just glad that we still have Marlin and it's owned by a American company with a fine tradition, and not some stupid financial holding company/group.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
People on various other forums have been freaking out at the prospect of Marlins being built with investment cast parts, instead of forged. I personally do not understand the angst, if there is one outfit that knows how to do it right, it's Ruger.

Engine blocks and jet engine turbine compressor blades... that are among the things that are investment cast. I can think of a harsher, more demanding application than a jet compressor blade.

In the many decades of making firearms via investment casting, and the hundreds of million of firearms made and sold by Ruger, has anyone heard of a failure attributed to an investment cast frame? Blackhawks will handle loads that will lead to a rapid disassembly of a S&W.

I won't be concerned about the future of Marlin manfacturing with Ruger, I'm just glad that we still have Marlin and it's owned by a American company with a fine tradition, and not some stupid financial holding company/group.
That's how I feel. Marlin should do well under Ruger management and will likely be around for a long time. Some investment companies would have sold off the brand name,equipment, patents & intellectual property to whoever would offer them a profit on it and that cold have been the end of Marlin
 

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I think gunhacker is spot-on, i have gained a lot of respect for cast parts over the years. The slide for the HiPoint pistol is cast, and not even steel, but they hold together. The frame for the Heritage Rough Rider is a light-weight alloy, i never heard of one coming apart (i just bought one!), If i am not mistaken, i think i read on some gun forum a year or so ago that the Freedom Arms single action frames are supplied by Pinetree Castings (Ruger). I would trust a Marlin with cast parts with no hesitation, Ruger will do it right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I was watching a YouTube video a few weeks ago on the Magnum Research BFR (Big Frame Revolver). They were showing a guy taking the frames for their revolvers out of a box from PineTree Casting
 

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Surely the people grousing about castings on internet forums are smarter than the metallurgists and engineers working for Pine Tree. :rolleyes: Most of them probably don't know horse manure from apple butter (but they would if they put it on toast).

Back in the 80's I was involved in purchasing a lot of 17-4 stainless investment cast parts used in injection molding machines. Very severe service. I don't pretend to know a ton about the process but know that Ruger has been an innovator in that game for a few decades. Investment casting seems like it's come a long way in those decades, probably mostly thanks to Bill Ruger's vision.

I think Marlin will be in better hands with Ruger than they were with Remington. Like others have said, awesome to see a gun company get Marlin rather than some holding company. I want a 94 in .357 like Bruce! It'll be interesting to see how all the parceled out pieces and brands fare with their new ownership(s). And most importantly how it works out for us consumers!
 
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