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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I HAVE THIS GUN AND KNOW A LITTLE ABOUT IT WOULD LOVE TO KNOW MORE. ITS A PREWAR MODEL SMITH AND WESSON REBORED FOR 38 SPECIAL. IT IS NICKEL PLATED. IT IS A VICTORY MODEL AND IT IS STAMPED INSIDE SWING 19 3 35. I AM ATTACHING PICS YOU CAN EMAIL ME AT [email protected] OR YOU CAN TEXT ME AT 731-504-8605 MY NAME IS BILLY AND I HOPE SOMEONE CAN HELP ME MORE. THANKS IN ADVANCE FOR ANY INFO. SERIAL# IS V 569XXX 12510252_761330253968794_7364365578318625343_n.jpg 12523143_761330247302128_4583425953948198893_n.jpg 12548957_761330257302127_1938104599400503740_n.jpg 12552899_761330327302120_5603076139683620538_n.jpg 12631516_761330390635447_2298154112781153965_n.jpg
 

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Welcome from AZ. A lot of Victory Models were modified after WWII to make low-priced pocket guns like yours. Lee Harvey Oswald was carrying 1 on Nov. 22, 1963. The numbers inside the cylinder are assembly #'s that ceased to have meaning after the serial # was assigned. Your gun has aftermarket plating & grips, the barrel was shortened & the forward cylinder lock cut off weakening it. Since .38 S&W are a bit wider than .38 specials those conversions tend to stretch or split cases making it hard or impossible to reload them. Values are pretty low, around here under $150. Hope this helps.
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All the ones i have seen that were cheaper have the v in the serial# mine is not attached to the serial# it is on the other side and the numbers are all the same on the whole gun every part and the serial numbers match the post war numbers what does mine have to have to be one of the rare ones?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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All the ones i have seen that were cheaper have the v in the serial# mine is not attached to the serial# it is on the other side and the numbers are all the same on the whole gun every part and the serial numbers match the post war numbers what does mine have to have to be one of the rare ones? 1459456396539_IMG_20160331_153246_918.jpg
 

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Yours is not rare. It is a standard British service revolver that has been modified. They stamp the V before the lanyard ring and the numbers on the other side. Your lanyard ring hole has been filled before it was plated. It is as Injunbro stated.
 

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All the ones i have seen that were cheaper have the v in the serial# mine is not attached to the serial# it is on the other side and the numbers are all the same on the whole gun every part and the serial numbers match the post war numbers what does mine have to have to be one of the rare ones? View attachment 56277
The fact that the barrel has been cut and the whole gun has been refinished is what kills the value
 

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BritishServiceRevolver(commercial_grade).jpg BritishService.jpg VictorySnub.jpg Rare and correspondingly in demand WWII revolvers are first in pristine condition. The more unusual the better, with a factory correct snub being way up the list. The 5 inch British Service Revolver was with 411,000+ units was easily the most common variant of any S&W ever built. If you notice all these examples have the ejector rod anchored on the front. S&W discovered they needed this feature before 1902; removal is ill-advised. The WWII serial range of M&Ps runs from about 680000 through SV811000+. It took from 1948 through 1966 to build the third million. Because they were so plentiful and inexpensive through the early 1960's BSRs were prime targets for alteration to more marketable goods. Yours being an example.

Don't shoot the messengers. And, welcome to the forums.
 
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