Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=123424066

Saw this pre-war .357 come up for auction the other day and had planned to place a bid on it. Since I wasn’t on my own computer at the time I decided to wait until I got home and use my own computer. Wasn’t in any hurry because the auction wasn’t supposed to end until 2/27. BIG MISTAKE ON MY PART! Checked the next day to find out that this no reserve auction had already closed (after less than a day) and sold pretty cheap too! Somebody got a great price on this! Lesson here: NEVER WAIT TO BID! IF YOU WANT IT BID ON IT RIGHT THEN! You never know what might happen…
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,920 Posts
I too find it odd that it ended so soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
Not to worry.... the seller, "Noconteetrader" is Lee Garrett, new owner of the "Other S&W Forum" and he knows what he's doing... I'm sure that both seller and buyer got a good deal.

If you look at the photo in detail, you can see some "Interesting Features" such as a post war backsight, non-origional stocks and perhaps a cut barrel and certainly a replacement (and in my opinion) an incorrect front sight....

While all "Registereds" are valueable, altered & incomplete (stocks) models are not priceless, even if altered by the factory and the replacement stocks are interesting, such as Sanderson's....

In my opinion, this gun sold for a correct, appropriate price if it went out for $1380.00

Drew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
I know Lee is a good guy but I wonder if something was wrong and he ended it early. Only one day after it started? I suspect he is contacting the bidder to apologize for having to restart the listing after something popped up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
The grips alone are worth probably $350, if not more. They are what I believe to be pre Dremel Kearsarge stocks, entirely done by hand. Note the chiseled "line" look to the areas between oak leafs. This compares to the later dotted, textured look we see in the later stocks. The earlier wood seems usually to be average wood, nothing special about it, just like this set. Later on Charles seems to have used more choice and exotic wood in his stocks.
These are my own observations, nothing I have been told by anyone.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Sebago Son said:
While all "Registereds" are valueable, altered & incomplete (stocks) models are not priceless, even if altered by the factory and the replacement stocks are interesting, such as Sanderson's....

In my opinion, this gun sold for a correct, appropriate price if it went out for $1380.00

Drew
I am going to have to disagree. Despite the issues with this .357, if this auction had been allowed to go the full 7 days I believe that it would have easily gone to 2K, and on this particular auction site maybe even more than that. It most certainly would have gone higher than it did, as my planned bid was more than the final winning price. This buyer got a bargain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
Maybe so, but I wouldn't get in a twist about it.

If you are willing to part with $2K and are okay with a heavily, and permanently modified gun with incorrect stocks, I'm sure it won't be long before you stumble across another.

Through my networking I bought a 6 1/2" factory refinished 1937 Registered last spring. It has correct Wesson Grip Adaptor and appropriate, unnumbered, fitted stocks, and what may be a replacement "Kings" marked front sight blade. I paid $1850, and didn't think it was a particularly hot deal.

Keep looking, you find one.

Good Luck.

Drew
SWCA 1802
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,920 Posts
There you go again Drew, being rational about a gun
You'd make a lousy Democrat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
azmick said:
There you go again Drew, being rational about a gun
You'd make a lousy Democrat
Mick, I did make a lousy Democrat..... but then again, the last time I participated in that party was in support of Hubert Humphrey's election bid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Kind of an interesting pistol. I wonder if the finish is original, or has it been reblued? I am kind of curious about the rear sight, I don't know if there is any way to be certain it was replaced by the factory. Lee seems to be fairly certain that it will letter as a 6" barrel also. Wouldn't an early RM like this have come with service grips?
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I’m not in a twist about it, just thought it was curious that the auction was ended early. Especially from a seller that is not known for doing that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
Maybe Lee just wanted to clean the gun up a little... who knows? It sure looks alot better in the photos for the second auction listing, doesn't it?

Looking at the photos of this revolver now, it I am fairly certain that this is indeed the original factory finish..... I agree with Lee that the "Star" marking in conjunction with the May, 1944 date was for the back sight. Who ever had this work done must've had some 'pull' as this was commercial trade conducted at a time when D-Day was only weeks away.... Maybe someday we'll be able to determine who actually ordered this rework and what for. My personal belief is that the rework was for the then-new click adjustable back sight.

With regard to the stocks, Registereds (and non-Registereds for that matter) could be shipped with Magnas (Pre-war type), Service Grips, with or without a Wesson Grip Adaptor. Recent research tends to suggest that the adaptors were far more common than was previously thought. Some Pre-War Magnums will appear with Roper's Target Stocks that look like a factory installation, but last I heard it has never been verified that these were a S&W option. As an aside, the last pristine pair of Pre-War Magnas I saw sold went for $750. Service Grips in the same condition would probably be about half that.

All in all, not a bad revolver and a good place to start a collection of Registereds or to acquire a representative example.

If you decide to bid at this point Wilson, I wish you every success.

Drew
SWCA 1802
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Sebago Son said:
If you decide to bid at this point Wilson, I wish you every success.

Drew
SWCA 1802
Thanks. Yes I do plan to bid but I doubt that I win, I’m sure somebody will be willing to pay more than I would for this gun. Whoever wins it’s going to sell for a lot more than it did last time!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,121 Posts
Drew makes some excellent points.
Registered Magnums aren't for the faint-of-heart, and they're the best example of 'buy the books before you buy the guns'.
They're wonderful examples of the gunmmaker's art, much like the Duesenburgs and Cords and Rolls Royces of the same bygone era.
You can't judge the prices and features exactly like any other Smith & Wesson revolver.
What're they worth?
Whatever it takes to plug that 'hole' in your collection. ;)
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
It's neat how a gun like this can cause one to classify different types of purist-collectors out there. Here we have a non stock RM, post war sights installed. Too bad there is no letter on this one yet. If Lee's suggestion is right, and it is the earliest known example of a RM factory fitted with post war sights (so far the earliest anyway) then that is a good reason to own/preserve it. At least I think it would be. And of course the lack of original grips, really, means nothing with those Kearsarge stocks on it. Look at the condition of them! By the way, one friend of Mr. Wendell was a man by the name of Justin Dart. I know nothing about Mr. Dart, except I believe he was also a fan of the shooting sports. That said, the initials JD are probably common enough, so it's only a suggestion of maybe. But the reality is, Mr. Wendell owned an RM, and many of his shooting friends owned them too. And he carved stocks for a lot of his friends.
Summing it up, some purists would turn away and not give it a second thought, while others will no doubt soon be in a bidding war over this gun. If I had the cash I'd be among them! I have emailed the link to this auction to 3 members of Mr. Wendell's family, so they too will be watching this one. I think the final sale price will exceed your perspective, Drew!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,121 Posts
Good points, Geoff.
Research on RM's just starts with a factory letter.
My # 3447 has one of the first documented micrometer rear sight installations on an RM, in 1946.
The gun was made in 1938, and the sight modification was done eight years later.
This RM was a 'test and evaluation' gun, was used as a 'loaner' as well as a test mule, and is still shown as 'open' on the factory books.
For the factory to have made up/modified and installed that sight during WW II, the owner of the gun would have had to be a person of substantial influence.
There were micrometer sights available on the Second Model K-22 (the first 'Masterpiece') before the war, so the change is, indeed, conceivable.
Like I've said before, it takes lots of study, a trustworthy seller, and incredible amounts of work to track down all the pertinent data on most Registered Magnums.
;)
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
I should buy it for my wife. She has a JD (Juris Doctorate).

I always watch the RM auctions with interest to keep up with that I think the one and only example I own might bring were I to offer it.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top