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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
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Got this recently at the estate sale of a good customer and friend. Born in Germany just after WW2 he came to the USA in the 60s and worked in a city factory called Riley Stoker. He moved to Oakham in the 70s during the urban sprawl days. Looks like he took up competition .22 for a short time most probably after acquiring this pistol as he dabbled in firearm trading snd eventually went on to own his own gun shop called the Outdoorsman. He was always a joy to have in the shop and always insisted on paying with “Coin of the realm”. Anyways... here is a time capsule back to 1972ish. I was thinking about selling it but after handling the gun and oh....that trigger. I had a 41 once and this is more to my liking. I’ll have to shoot it.
 

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Hey 500,

Those are fantastic firearms!

You are truly fortunate!

Later, Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I paid extra for the case and contents. Kind of a package that should stay together is my thinking.He even modified the magazine with brass followers snd an extended floor plate so you could get it out easier with those “target” grips. They sure do make your hand feel welcome!
My old eyes may need to squint a bit with those bullseye sights but I’ll manage ;)
 

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I've been lucky enough to be able to shoot a whole gaggle of rimfire bullseye matches whilst stationed at NSSF New London, back in the 90's, with the finest bunch of Squids and Coasties you would care to know. I developed "High Standard" fever about that time, and absorbed everything I could from my mentors, a fine LCDR who taught up on the hill at Sub School, and perhaps the worlds crustiest, gravelly voiced (pussycat that would do anything for you) of a CWO4, who happened to be a prolific collector of High Standards. Eventually while on leave with my bride, out in Wisconsin, we managed to stumble upon a gun shop that had a nice, 70's (or 60's?) Supermatic Trophy, with a 7.25" fluted barrel that I used to better my scores with, and was lucky enough to have the sear start to let go while I was up in CT for a third tour in the late 90's, and was able to take it to the other side of Hartford into a nice older neighborhood, where I dropped it off for repairs and a good, overall reconditioning with one of the retired master fitters at High Standard (the guys that tuned the 10Xs and Victors). I WANT to say it was Bob Shea, but part of me thinks that was not right, maybe another fellow, but certainly of equal talent, and he had that gun right in a week or two, new sear, tuned, cleaned up a few magazine feed lips for me, etc...

A fellow "boot Chief", shooter and neighbor in Navy housing and I (okay, mostly him) built three gorgeous wood pistol boxes, one each for him, my wife and I. We still have ours, I'm sure he still has his, the were built to be near bomb proof!

Thank you for luring me down memory lane to the good old days, when eyes were sharper, nerves were calmer and we had our whole lives in front of us, to shoot, and work and live and love (and shoot)...

The box in service, circa 2004, at Dam Neck, at the LANTFLT Matches


The box, still toting precision paper punching equipment, post retirement (beard & gut)...
 

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Interesting..your box opens opposite of mine/Werners. I have been told Mr.Tessnau was left handed but shot with his right hand,as the grips are definitely RH grips.,,but the box opens to the right.
I thought that same thing, but wrote it off as just a "shooter peculiarity" of days past (shooters are kind of odd ducks, some of us...)

Edit to add; Actually, no, he's a right hand shooter, someone secured the High Standard in the carry clamps backward is all, and the spotting scope is in the transit position, it would be unlocked and swung around to get the eyepiece closer to the shooter's position without him having to break position/natural point of aim...
 

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I have the same grips on this Supermatic 101. They feel amazing and the thumb rest is like the pistol was grafted to my hand. The weights make it rock steady when shooting. Mine has the barrel ported instead of that attachable compensator like yours. The last time I checked those Space Guns were going for $1200.00 plus and you even have that amazing case with provenance. That is a once in a lifetime find. Really good job.
Air gun Trigger Revolver Wood Gun barrel
 

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Some acquired tastes are quite refined...

What a beautiful kit. You know that the original owner spent quite a bit of time and invested in extensive research before making the choices that you found in that box...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
"the spotting scope is in the transit position, it would be unlocked and swung around to get the eyepiece closer to the shooter's position without him having to break"

The spotting scope is rigidly attached and is useable to the right side of the shooter, as soon as they open the box. (Once you remove the protective end cap)
 

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"the spotting scope is in the transit position, it would be unlocked and swung around to get the eyepiece closer to the shooter's position without him having to break"

The spotting scope is rigidly attached and is useable to the right side of the shooter, as soon as they open the box. (Once you remove the protective end cap)
Oh, okay, mine's on a bar with two knobs, loosen them, pivot up and back, and the scope sits farther back, closer to the eye.
 

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my father shot competition with the Middlesex County Sheriffs Dept, usually 3 times a week for 40 years, from early 50's to mid 90's. both 22 LR, and 38 special.
he actually wore out a High Standard Olympic like the one in the first picture.
it was used when he bought it, so we do not know how many rounds actually went through the barrel. but he put at least 600,000 rounds through it over the years. when i finally got it it was so wore out when i took it to a gunsmith for refurbish, he said it was not worth rebuilding and it would be cheaper to buy a new one.
 

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They were fine shooting guns, but my mags had to be scrupulously clean, or I'd snag an alibi a night, sure as heck. They were all, original High Standard mags, about half steel base, half red plastic. Gosh, I remember walking the isles at a Springfield Mass gun show, and finding a set screw muzzle brake in some guys $5 box on his table. :)
 
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