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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Smith & Wesson Revolver with "La Industrial Orbea" engraved on the barrell

With my father passing recently I inherited this pistol and a couple of other firearms. From the little bit I can find this was made in Spain about the time of WWI. I would really like to know more about it and maybe from the serial number what year it was made. Serial Number: 141165* on butt of handle and by trigger. There is a hand engraved number as well (WLA9373) and I don't know what that is or what it means. It wouldn't hurt to know the value either for insurance purposes. I think it belonged to my grandfather who fought in WWI. What kind of ammunition does it take as well. I would like to take it to a firing range and fire it. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Sorry to tell ya , but it ain't a US-made Smith & Wesson. Numerous companies in Spain made copies of S&W revolvers. Some pretty good , most not so good. I have heard the Orbea name before.

Holster is for a US 1911 .45 automatic.


I don't know about shooting it. It would take a competent gunsmith to tell you if it was safe and what ammunition to use.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. Well the holster matches the time period I was thinking. Yes, what I found about the "La Industrial Orbea" Eibar is that it was made in Spain. I found "a68" engraved in a couple of places if that is helpful to anyone looking at this thread.
 

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Hermanos Orbea (Orbea Brothers) and Orbea y Cia (and Company) I have encountered. The logo on your grips appears to be the OH variety. The exaggerated hammer appears to make it an earlier gun. They were on the scene from the mid teens through the latter twenties. I have my greatgrandfather's OH 1926 .38 Special. Earlier Spanish guns tend toward .38 Largo (.38 Long Colt), the chamber length should give that away and .32-20 (should be an easy determination if so).

The simple advice is not to shoot it. Spanish revolvers prior to Llama and Astra have a spotty reputation for metallurgy. Its value is largely as an heirloom that is irreplaceable; economically in this condition well south of $200 (IMHO).

Guns of this type led S&W to boldly strike, MADE IN U.S.A., beginning in 1921.
 

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Very likely your grandfather brought that back as a war souvenir along w/ a holster he picked up. I'd mount it & the holster in a shadow box w/ a description of it's history & enjoy it as a keepsake.
 

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I'd keep it unfired and for sentimental reasons. BTW...Welcome aboard from a the "GunShine" state of Florida.


State of over "1 MILLION 150 THOUSAND" Concealed Carry Licenses.
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass!
 
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Hello and welcome to the forum.

As copies go, that's a pretty good one. But I would echo the advice above.
 

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Spanish pistols were frequently encountered during WWII. Officially neutral , Spanish gun companies did sell to the Nazi's. Waffenamt marked Spanish automatics like the Astra 600 and Star B were purchased in large numbers and are gaining in collector interest/value. The generic "RUBY" pattern of .32 automatics , made by Llama , Orbea and several lesser know firms , were popular with the French resistance.
 
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