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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to learn more about an old revolver we found that belonged to my grandpa. I have looked up the serial number C14xxxx so i know it was manufactured pre 1952. It does not have any model stampings on it since it was before they began stamping Model 10 on these. He joined the navy in the late 40s and served in the Korean war. I am wondering if anyone knows much about these guns, and if it is possible this was a service issued gun. He has passed away so we don't know much about the history of the gun. it seems to be in good condition, especially considering it is close to 70 years old. I may post some pictures if that would help.
 

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I have two that might look like your grandpa's pre Model 10.

C113xxx which shipped 9/50


C155xxx which shipped 5/50
i love you and always will poems

There is a reasonable change yours shipped in 1950 but note that my higher s/n revolver shipped first from the factory. S&W did not ship in s/n order.

.....and two more things.....1) welcome to the forum and 2) photos always help
 
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Nice gun. don't sell. Here is what happened to it about 13 years later as a Model 10-4 6" barrel.

 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great thank you. I am hoping they will come around to my view on it and keep it. From your knowledge is it possible this would have been issued to him when he was in the Navy? He joined post WWII, and before Korea. He served on a destroyer.
 

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I doubt it very much but you never know. A letter from the S&W historical society is about the only way to know its history.
 

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While it may not have been issued by the navy it might have been bought while on active duty and carried on duty. Even up into Vietnam personal sidearms were permitted in various units.


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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Very good point bovw, it does have that sentimental value for me since it was my grandfathers.

I will update once we know what we are doing with the guns. If they decide not to sell them I will keep them and clean them up.

Does anyone know an estimate on the value? If they decide to sell I may just buy it myself.
 

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The M&P would go for $300-350 here. Prices vary some by location and they made a bunch of M&P’s. If you have the original box,etc. that will affect the price also. A check of GunBroker.com will yield some prices .Hank
 

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Great thank you. I am hoping they will come around to my view on it and keep it. From your knowledge is it possible this would have been issued to him when he was in the Navy? He joined post WWII, and before Korea. He served on a destroyer.
Generally the US government does not take kindly to people enlisted in the service taking the weapon they were issued home with them. Other than pilots, very few naval personell are even issued pistols. Its not like they have to repel boarders much these days, so the chances are very slim that it was a gun he carried in the navy, if he was even issued one at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That makes sense. I have heard a lot of stories from veterans who said their firearms were deemed “destroyed” when they left the military so they could keep them. But it is also unlikely that my grandfather as a Captain on a destroyer would need a handgun.
 

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If he was the Captain he could have had anything on board he wanted. Navy Captain equals an Air Force Colonel.
 

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Since military revolvers of the .38 Special variety were 4 inch and Snubs, very likely not. The few S&Ws of this era ordered by the USMC are marked "U.S. Property" on the backstrap and command huge premiums.
Any commanding officer not under direct supervision especially in that time could do pretty much as they pleased.
 

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That makes sense. I have heard a lot of stories from veterans who said their firearms were deemed “destroyed” when they left the military so they could keep them. But it is also unlikely that my grandfather as a Captain on a destroyer would need a handgun.
This revolver was definitely not an issue gun or acquired by or through the armed forces; it's a perfectly standard civilian M&P. It also appears to be in too good a condition to have "served" in any capacity.

While service personnel in various branches on the ground during the Korean and Vietnam wars found opportunity to carry personally acquired sidearms, no officer aboard a navy ship would have opportunity or reason to do so.

As your grandfather's gun, it's a heirloom anyways. Most people buy guns at some point that don't have anything to do with their jobs ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
We are keeping the gun. I took it to a gunsmith today to look over and he said there was a very small amount of rust inside the barrel, but it appeared to just be surface rust. He also said the trigger seems “off” so there may be some parts that need to be replaced internally. Does anyone have a guide for these guns to disassemble and clean.
Also does anyone have any advice for cleaning this gun? With my other guns I just use Hoppe’s #9 to clean and then Hoppe’s gun oil, but those are all made in the past 15 years so I didn’t know if I need to do something different.
 
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