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Discussion Starter #1
The reason for my question is, as some of you know, our house was broken into on December 23 (merry freakin' Christmas) and all of my rifle ammo was stolen. :evil: Anyway, along with all of my factory ammo, I also lost all of my rifle brass that I had been saving for years.

Now, I have a stainless Marlin Guide Gun that I dearly love. I haven't replaced my ammo for it yet because I am toying with reloading for it. I already have the dies, but would need to get primers, powder and...of course, my brass. I only shoot about 25 rounds a year out of this gun (my whitetail getter) so reloading may not be economically feasible.

I reload for handguns, but haven't ventured into rifle cartridges yet because my rifles are mainly for putting game on the table and they don't see the volume put through them that my handguns do.

What say you? Should I reload for the .45-70 and if so, are there any powder suggestions?
 

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Sure Cush! Reloading is, as you know, a rewarding proposition regardless of how many rounds you use.... in fact, i bet that if you did reload for the .45-70 you'd use it more and get more out of it....

Come on down and use my gear if you want to... We reload .45-70 with both Jacketed and Cast Lead slugs.... My adopted son Eric got his deer last year with Ryan's Marlin 1895s and a cast bullet load.

IMR-3031 is a very good power to start with... but bring your own because a pound doesn't go too far when you're filling these cases!

Drew
 

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Cush, absolutely load for it!!

I agree with Drew it can be very rewarding. My load of 350 lead Oregon Trail bullet and 43 gr of Reloader 7 makes for a great load. I’ve put two rounds touching at 115 paces using my guide gun with this load.

Go for it!

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What a bunch of enablers you all are! ;) Okay, so I picked up some large rifle primers this afternoon, but I'll still need to replace my stolen brass and pick up some powder. I also want to get a new press for this endeavor. My RCBS JR2 doesn't quite have the leverage I want for reloading rifle cases.

Drew, I'll be in touch.
 

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Don't underestimate your Jr. Press! :)

I've loaded plenty of .45-70 on a Jr. Since my Rock Chucker is dedicated for use with a Piggy-Back progressive arrangement, I've even been using my old Jr. for case-forming duties. Just last weekend, I formed some .33WCF from .45-70 on the Jr. No Problems :)

xtm
 

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Here are three of the cartridges for lever action rifles that I cast bullets and handload for - .33WCF, .30-40 Krag, and .30-30. (In the spirit of trying to keep this thread on handloading the .45-70 - the pair on the Left are .33 WCF, which is just a .45-70 case necked-down to accept a .338" bullet. :) I form these cases very easily on my Jr. press.)

If I didn't handload for these cartridges, I would rarely shoot the guns. Since I do cast and handload for 'em I shoot 'em fairly frequently and have gotten pretty good at hitting targets and game at various distances with all three. Familiarity with a weapon and how it shoots is just as important as precision target accuracy, IMO.

Mr. Pierce,
Here is the 1886 in .33WCF :) :


xtm
 

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The 45-70 is easy to load and fun to shoot. The first loading that I did with the 45-70 I wanted a bit of power for hunting moose and took 405 gr factory loads, pulled the bullets and put them back together with a different powder charge I believe it was 53 gr of 3031 for over 1800 fps in my heavy barrel Siam Mauser, = serios moose medicine.

:lol:
 

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Thanks for the picture XTM. As a kid growing up the 33 win was the family deer gun. I have very fond memories of that rifle. :)
 
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