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I don't know much about the S&W Victory models but this one is for sale. I only have the one picture sorry. I think this was a lend lease revolver as it does have the English broadhead arrow stamp on the right side. It is chambered in 38 S&W not .38 Special. I have not seen the gun in person. It is being offered at $425. My questions are should this be marked U.S Property/United States Property on the left side? Are the grips correct? I know the photo is not the best but were the revolvers parked or blue and does this appear to be refinished. What other features should I be looking for? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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At a glance, it is an Aussie. Refurbed at Munitions Australia in 1953-55. The serial number, whether there are U.S. Property markings, all figure into original dating. I doubt the grips will match. Most were imported by Vega of Sacramento. $425 is ambitious in my opinion. British Broad Arrows are on the left. D^D is Department of Defence . FTR is Factory Thorough Repair.


Added: You will find several on Gunbroker. One has a $399 start with no bids. Ignore the wishful pricing on the others. You can see what pulls a bid in this category of revolver.
 

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The finish can vary, depending on when it was made. Very early in the war, before the USA got involved they were the regular commercial bright blued finish. Next the were done with more of a satin blued finish. That requires less polishing beforehand which speeds production. After that they went to a finish called black magic (I think) then on to parkerized, but those two may be reversed. don't have my book handy to tell.
Also the early guns had commercial grips, like yours and eventually they went to a panel without checkering or medallions.
posting the serial number would help determine when it was shipped and which finish and grips it would have likely had. Is the butt drilled for a lanyard ring? Many had the hole filled in
 

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make mine 45 acp 😎
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yep a refurb aussie as W has said, the finish would date from the FTR or even later, the S&W trademark is quite faint.. looks like someone has been nibbling on the front sight ?

if its a V prefix serial number smooth & plain round tops were original.. there should be a stamped serial number inside one of the grips.


I'd pass it by. plenty of better condition and more original ones available.

Concerning the US Property marking, it depends.. that would/should be there for actual lend lease gun, but many of these went on contract (especially earlier in the war) and were actually purchased so they dont have the US Property marking..
S&W owed the Brits a large chunk of change due to a failed light rifle contract, so Smith emptied out the revolver cupboard in the first part of the war to pay of the debt
 

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Discussion Starter #6
At a glance, it is an Aussie. Refurbed at Munitions Australia in 1953-55. The serial number, whether there are U.S. Property markings, all figure into original dating. I doubt the grips will match. Most were imported by Vega of Sacramento. $425 is ambitious in my opinion. British Broad Arrows are on the left. D^D is Department of Defence . FTR is Factory Thorough Repair.


Added: You will find several on Gunbroker. One has a $399 start with no bids. Ignore the wishful pricing on the others. You can see what pulls a bid in this category of revolver.
Thanks Waidmann
 

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You are welcome. If you are interested in WWII Victory era S&W I suggest you look into the many variations and see if you have genuine interest. FYI the British Service Revolver, 5" .38 S&W was the most prolific piece they will ever make. You can take your time and be picky.
 

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It does indeed look like somebody has filed down the front sight. As others have said, these are relatively available, so that alone would make me pass this one by unless it was a screaming deal, and 425 ain’t that.

It has the standard Australian refinish, a dull phosphate with (in the right light) often a greenish tint. The work was done at the Lithgow Small Arms Factory in New South Wales, best known among collectors for its version of the .303 SMLE rifle. They were pretty conservative about the refinish and left trigger, hammer, and ejector rod original. However, these were refinished in batches, and hardly any came through the FTR with their numbered stocks.

The guns were not issued again after the FTR (some last saw service in the Korean War), so most of these are in pretty good shape compared to those reimported earlier from Britain. The cluster of markings around the MADE IN USA makes them easy to identify. Look for metal showing in the stampings; I’ve come across two so far that were re-refinished here, recognizable if the Australian stampings are under the last finish.
 

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