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That's an early one, probably from late in 1917. Chopped up like that it's worth only what somebody is willing to pay. I wouldn't be interested at $100. The stocks alone could be worth about $50 to the right buyer. Now, if the trigger guard was intact instead of being "Fitzed", I'd might go $200, but there are others who love the idea of a short barreled .45 and would perhaps pay more.
John
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! I'm not so hard on the poor thing as John. But, he's right. It has lost a lot of value due to the mods even if the front sight seems to be well done. There are folks out there that collect these modded revolvers. They might go higher depending on the bore, action and finish.
 

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too bad.. with the 4 digit sn, it's from early 1917 WW1 production - in original configuration, it could be worth 1000+/- depending on condition..

chopped up, not so much.... still cool, though not a pleasant shooter I bet..
 

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If you know the provenance of the gun, that could greatly enhance the value.
If you could prove it belonged to a Texas Ranger for instance, it would bring a premium in Texas and some other states.
Those type of modifications were worth a lot more 30 years ago.
It was a popular modification among crooks and law enforcement during Prohibition.
The people that knew about them and appreciated them have all died out.
 

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I am in agreement that the value has been lost, with the exception of the few who fancy "Fitz" modifications. Still it is a kool looking piece and in an age when magnums had yet to make their entrance into the gun world, 45's were popular because no one made a "46." Still a great conversation piece and YES, it could be a comfort to have when an up and close threat is present. - Hank
 

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Didn't mean to sound so negative about that old Smith. I really like the 1917 model. The short barrel and sight doesn't bother me so much. But seeing an open trigger guard on any gun just sends shivers down my spine. :eek:
I would guess that particular piece was converted way back when 1917s were inexpensive surplus guns and was someones special conversion dream. Heck, I'm guilty of doing the same to an old beat up Swedish Mauser. But I left the trigger guard intact! :D
TBH , the least amount that I've seen any 1917 sell for at the auction around here is $250. And that was for a very beat up and loose gun that looked as though it was used to hammer nails. The serial number was completely obliterated. Wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole at any price. Danc46 and Guy are correct in that there are some who love the Fitz configuration, know what it costs to have it done and so are willing to pay a higher price for a gun already converted.
If you are one of those who like the Fitz special conversion and are thinking of buying that old warhorse I am just saying don't be shy to make a low ball offer.
John
 

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Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Starting pistol
^ I agree with what I've read and the dating toward the very end of 1917. Based on what I have seen in the past year I'd wager $300-$350 selling price. One semi disadvantage is that it not a Colt. Mr. Fitzgerald of course was a Colt employee and there were factory Fitz Specials. Seeing S&W's of this ilk is a liitle more outside the norm. Also a true job on a New Service would have resulted in a much shorter barrel, a bobbed hammer and a reduction of the grip frame.
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View attachment 20100 ^ I agree with what I've read and the dating toward the very end of 1917. Based on what I have seen in the past year I'd wager $300-$350 selling price. One semi disadvantage is that it not a Colt. Mr. Fitzgerald of course was a Colt employee and there were factory Fitz Specials. Seeing S&W's of this ilk is a liitle more outside the norm. Also a true job on a New Service would have resulted in a much shorter barrel, a bobbed hammer and a reduction of the grip frame.
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Welcome to the forums.
. . . Glad you mentioned the grip frame. I always felt the N-frame S&W had a better grip to trigger reach than the bigger Colt New Service. I like the S&W better - Hank
 
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