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I recently found this in a pawn shop. Can’t determine the model of it. Cartridge is 32 WCF, which I guess is 32-20? Last patent date is Dec ‘14. Serial is 74646. In small numbers near the cylinder hinge is 3923. Tight gun with some cosmetic issues from use. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

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Can’t upload pics from my rural location but will try when I’m near stronger signal.
 

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I don;t know a thing about the revolver but will follow and learn as other chime in. It looks pretty neat to me and would cause me to be hunting dies and bullets if I had run into it for a low price.
 

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I don;t know a thing about the revolver but will follow and learn as other chime in. It looks pretty neat to me and would cause me to be hunting dies and bullets if I had run into it for a low price.
Thanks! Bore is good, and gun is tight. 275.00 wasn’t too bad, I don’t think.
 

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If I had the money I’d have bought it if it was 32-20. I can’t tell you anything about the revolver except I wish I had it.
Love those old pistols!
Thanks! I have a Winchester ‘73 and a Marlin ‘93 that are in that caliber. Don’t know how hard it is now to find ammo. I have a partial box that I got about 15 years ago.
 

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I have three of those old things, each in worse shape than the other ( if you line them up the right way). But they all shoot well. Ammo is out there but you're better off loading your own in the long run, preferably with lead 100 or 115 gr bullets.
I see three notches on the frame. Someone was either bad with a screw driver or quick on the draw!

John
 
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I have three of those old things, each in worse shape than the other ( if you line them up the right way). But they all shoot well. Ammo is out there but you're better off loading your own in the long run, preferably with lead 100 or 115 gr bullets.
I see three notches on the frame. Someone was either bad with a screw driver or quick on the draw!
John
Thanks! It has notches around the frame. Idiot artwork, perhaps. I would like to know what model this is. There are so many models and types, so I have no idea.
 

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I would like to know what model this is. There are so many models and types, so I have no idea.
Officially, you have a .32-20 Hand Ejector Model 1905. Collector further classify it as being the third model, 4th change. S&W used three different cartridge roll marks on the barrel that help to pin down date of manufacture. From 1899 to 1914 barrels were marked "32 Winchester Ctg". 1914 to 1922 guns were "32 W.C.F CTG". And from 1922 to end of production, "32-20 CTG". So your gun was made between 1914 -1922. Additionally, your revolver has no made in the USA stamp on the right side below the cylinder which didn't start until 1922. Those worn stocks with the gold medallions indicate pre 1920.
I would wager that a date of manufacture would be just before US involvement in WWI, say 1915-17, but when it left the factory inventory is a guess without paying to get a letter from S&W.

John
 

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I would wager that a date of manufacture would be just before US involvement in WWI, say 1915-17, but when it left the factory inventory is a guess without paying to get a letter from S&W.
You’d win that wager. Guns with documented ship dates from the mid-70-thousand serial range all shipped in 1917, so this one almost certainly did also.

Since it still has the large logo on the sideplate, it was manufactured before the middle of the year, when logo stamping ceased for the next few years as a war-time economizing measure.
 

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I would like to know what model this is. There are so many models and types, so I have no idea.
Officially, you have a .32-20 Hand Ejector Model 1905. Collector further classify it as being the third model, 4th change. S&W used three different cartridge roll marks on the barrel that help to pin down date of manufacture. From 1899 to 1914 barrels were marked "32 Winchester Ctg". 1914 to 1922 guns were "32 W.C.F CTG". And from 1922 to end of production, "32-20 CTG". So your gun was made between 1914 -1922. Additionally, your revolver has no made in the USA stamp on the right side below the cylinder which didn't start until 1922. Those worn stocks with the gold medallions indicate pre 1920.
I would wager that a date of manufacture would be just before US involvement in WWI, say 1915-17, but when it left the factory inventory is a guess without paying to get a letter from S&W.

John
Thanks, John! I greatly appreciate that info. Now I know what I have.
 

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I would wager that a date of manufacture would be just before US involvement in WWI, say 1915-17, but when it left the factory inventory is a guess without paying to get a letter from S&W.
You’d win that wager. Guns with documented ship dates from the mid-70-thousand serial range all shipped in 1917, so this one almost certainly did also.

Since it still has the large logo on the sideplate, it was manufactured before the middle of the year, when logo stamping ceased for the next few years as a war-time economizing measure.
Thanks! Looks like y’all have answered my questions! I do appreciate that!
 

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Thanks! I have a Winchester ‘73 and a Marlin ‘93 that are in that caliber. Don’t know how hard it is now to find ammo. I have a partial box that I got about 15 years ago.
.32-20 is in most of the local sporting goods/gun stores around here (northern Utah) - Cabela's, Sportsman's Warehouse, etc, for example.
Runs ~$60/box of 50.
 

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It's usually around $50 here. That's pretty good incentive to load yer own!

John
 

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It's usually around $50 here. That's pretty good incentive to load yer own!

John
I haven't bought any factory cartridges in 7-8 yrs, so was shocked at the prices I recently saw in a local store; had intended to buy a box of .32 Longs, but quickly decided to reload the cases I already had. What accounts for a virtual doubling of prices in just a few years? It's NOT inflation--that alone can't explain it!
 

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Well, I suppose its that many of the less-popular calibers have been dropping in popularity, since the decline of the "cowboy action shooting" fad from the late 1990s & early 2000s.

While some still keep the hobby going, many have dropped out of organized activities, and as a result less ammo is being fired, so less is being made - and small occasional runs always have a higher production cost per box than either large occasional runs or small regular runs.


I have a box of .25-20 Winchester that I bought for my father's Win 1892 (1909 production) back in the mid-1990s - it still has the $59 price tag from then, so the $75-$89 (depending on brand) I see now really isn't that bad.


That said, a box of 100 Hornady .32 WinSpl 170gr flat-point bullets cost about half in 1993 what it costs now - and it is continuously available now (back then they made a batch every other year, now it is always on the shelf at Sportsmen's Warehouse etc). Go figure.
 
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