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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a S&W Model 64-6 that I ONLY use for range shooting and learning about revolvers. I took it completely apart, thoroughly cleaned it, and replaced the the original mainspring with a Reduced Power Power Rib mainspring from Wolff. The DA trigger pull is really nice and smooth and noticeably lighter than before. I also replaced the original rebound spring with a 13 pound reduced power rebound spring - the SA trigger pull is now VERY light - I MEAN VERY LIGHT - I'm OK with it like that, but I just wanted to clarify that changing the current 13 pound rebound spring to a 14 pound or 15 pound reduced power rebound spring should make the SA trigger pull heavier than it is now, right? I didn't do any polishing or "tuning" of the internal parts related to the trigger engagement surfaces - just the spring replacement. Thanks !
 

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I have just been doing the same type of thing to a few revolvers. The factory rebound spring is 18# so your 13# should significantly reduce the SA pull weight. When putting in a lighter rebound slide spring, I also polish the rebound slide and where it rides in the frame. Through a reduction in friction the lighter spring can then do the work of the heavier one it replaced. Just polishing the rebound slide and a couple other engagement points, then putting in a 16# rebound spring, and a full power power rib has resulted in a 1.4 pound drop in trigger pull in DA on my 617. Polishing rebound slide and a 16# spring with the stock main spring brought my M15 from 10.75 down to 9.64. In my 2.5 inch 686 I used a Reduced power, power rib, and a 14# rebound spring along with some polishing. Trigger went from 12# down to 9.74. In all cases the SA weight was also reduced by 1/2 to 1 pound.
 

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I have used a 14# rebound spring, and the stock S&W spring. It resulted in a better DA and SA trigger pull......but I can't say by how much. In the newer guns (Semi-Auto Rugers) that I've gotten, they are pretty nice as is. They are DA/SA for the SR22, and SA for the LC9s, and MUCH better than the Smith revolvers. Except for the M-67, that is! You only have to touch the trigger in SA, and it fires. Good on a Target Revolver! Bob
 

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It boggles my mind when people swap springs for a lighter trigger instead of properly de-burring the rebound slide, etc.... reducing the friction is what's really needed. Then after a couple thousand rounds & things wear in push-off starts happening. S&W doesn't put extra strong springs because they're sadists, they know what's needed for consistent primer strikes. In the countless action jobs I've done replacement springs were needed only once or twice.
 

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I'm no gunsmith, but I have shot my revolvers quite a bit, to 'wear them in', besides changing the RS in a couple of them. When I sent them to S&W, they always put in a new spring (as per current standards). So, almost all are std. springs.....with well "worn in" actions. Nowadays, I prefer shooting my SA Semi-Auto Rugers more. I get more exercise chasing brass!!!! :D Bob
 

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To me, a "light" trigger isn't necessarily a good trigger.

I expect a certain amount of take up resistance, but also a certain amount of pressure to overcome to actually release the sear.

For me, a good single action trigger "breaks" clean and sharp. No creep. No motion before release. It should take some pressure to make it break.

If you're working to lighten the action, make sure you verify that you have not introduced "push off" problems.
 

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In the single action trigger pull the mainspring is already fully compressed, and the rebound spring is mostly compressed. To fire in SA, you must overcome the friction where the SA sear is engaged, finish compressing the rebound spring, and overcome any friction elsewhere in the mechanism. Since the SA sear engagement is only about .004 deep, and the rebound spring is mostly compressed, the remaining friction between parts is not an insignificant part of the pull weight.
Tried my altered guns out today and had 100% ignition. with trigger pull weights of 9.6-9.8 pounds and a very slick action I am happy with the results. The triggers aren't too light, nor obnoxiously heavy. I will be ordering another Wolf full power spring as I like the way it makes the trigger pull feel
 

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Welcome to the forum! welcome01
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, all, for the feedback and guidance. Besides generally just wanting to learn more about revolvers, this video by Jerry Miculek made changing the springs look so easy - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9gn7zE5b3g. I bought this revolver used - I think it was a gun used in a correctional facility - so, if it is like some of the other PD surplus guns I've purchased, it was carried but not fired a lot - the internals were very clean when I opened the gun. While cleaning the internals, I did very lightly polish the rebound slide and the inside of the frame where the rebound slide moves - really, more of a cleaning than a polish job. I think I'll eventually put in a heavier rebound spring, after a trip to the range to see if everything works as it is now. Thanks again!
 

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As I have said, I changed a few rebound springs with a 14# Wolff. While that is OK for a target revolver that you fire SA, not so much for a combat or carry revolver. When S&W replaced the rebound spring with a heavier spring, I noticed that the revolver 'reset' considerably quicker than before, which is what you want when firing DA. So a heavier spring is desirable on a carry revolver. ;) Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So a heavier spring is desirable on a carry revolver. ;) Bob
Absolutely ! In fact, I never change anything on a gun I'm going to carry - I leave them 100% stock. With other guns, range-only guns, I like to experiment - with this Model 64, I may change the rebound spring to one a bit higher - just so see if it's the 13# rebound spring that's mainly responsible for the REALLY light SA trigger pull
 

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Anything I carry will remain stock. The rest are range guns. Through conservative stoning of a few parts along with smoothing the frame where the rebound slide rides then installing a 15-16# rebound spring I am reducing DA by 1-1.25# and the SA by 3/4 # or so. These are newer k & L frames with stock trigger pulls of 10.75-12# and a SA of around 4.5# - 4.80#. They end up with a pretty slick action but still have a 9.6-10# trigger pull..but feel better than that because of being smooth. The SA now runs. 3.7-4.25 and remains crisp, not a hair trigger by any means. I have an old pre model 10 with a 8.4# trigger pull. It's probably been shot a lot in the past 65 years and is well broken in. Being that light though makes me wonder if someone might have cut a coil off the rebound spring. Will have to look. Curt bought a used 4" m28 a couple years ago with the nicest trigger of all our guns together. Checked it tonight. At 7.9# and the slickest action you ever felt it's a joy to shoot. His SA was 2.4#... Almost too light ...almost. We want to open it up some day and see what's been done because we are both pretty sure someone worked on it and did a darn good job
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'd classify myself a somewhat knowledgeable hobbyist - I've taken a Glock Armorers Course and a week-long 1911 class and completely taken apart almost all of my guns, with the help of YouTube videos, but I stay away from anything like what a real gunsmith would do regarding a trigger job, where he might actually modify the sear engagement surfaces. One thing I learned in the 1911 class was that there's a lot to know about doing a trigger job the right way - and that it's easy to do too much and screw things up - so while I'm comfortable with changing springs and polishing some of the interior surfaces, like where the rebound spring rides in my Model 64-6, I'll leave what I consider the real gunsmith stuff to real gunsmiths.
 

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Do what I did with all my revolvers......just shoot them a lot. This 'wears in the action' without doing a trigger job. It is the same thing.....in the end result! All my triggers are pretty somooth, but not real light! It's been called "A poor man's trigger job" in some articles I have read, long ago. Bob
 

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I'd classify myself a somewhat knowledgeable hobbyist - I've taken a Glock Armorers Course and a week-long 1911 class and completely taken apart almost all of my guns, with the help of YouTube videos, but I stay away from anything like what a real gunsmith would do regarding a trigger job, where he might actually modify the sear engagement surfaces. One thing I learned in the 1911 class was that there's a lot to know about doing a trigger job the right way - and that it's easy to do too much and screw things up - so while I'm comfortable with changing springs and polishing some of the interior surfaces, like where the rebound spring rides in my Model 64-6, I'll leave what I consider the real gunsmith stuff to real gunsmiths.
Amen to that. A person could very easily screw up a good revolver. I know what I can do and don't attempt to push it
 
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