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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need a little guidance, refinishing a model #3 Russian 1st model. I need to know the correct color for the hammer, trigger and trigger guard? As well as the size and font for the top strap and serial number? Thanks in advance.

Best I can tell from images is that the hammer is blue
Trigger guard Is blue
Trigger is Nickle
It will be strictly a display piece so I really wanna get the color combo correct on those parts.
 

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First Model Russian (Old, Old Model Russian or Model No. 3 Russian 1st Model)
Revolver Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel


Caliber: .44 S&W Russian. Single-action revolver built on a top-break frame. Identical to American Models except chambered for .44 Russian cartridge instead of .44 American, and civilian commercial guns are marked “Russian Model” on barrel. 6-shot fluted cylinder with a nominal length of 1.42”. Has smooth walnut grips, with blue or nickel finish. Eight-inch barrel standard, with 6” and 7” also produced; round blade front sight with the rear sight is a notch that projects on top of barrel latch, this model has a butt swivel. They are found with either features of the Transitional American or the Second Model American. Weight of this model with 6” barrel is 38 oz.

Commercial guns numbered with the American models in serial number range 6000 - 32800 were manufactured c. 1871 – 1874. Russian contract guns serial number 1 – 20000.

ID Key: Same as American models, but with stepped chambers and marked “Russian Model”
 

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Robert, the hammer and trigger were case colored. I don't know the type font or size...and I doubt anyone really knows. Someone with a sister gun may be able to measure the size. I have a 3rd model Russian and can measure the size for you if you want. But, there is no guarantee they are the same. They might even have differed among the 3 Russian contracts. The most knowledgeable experts on these guns have passed away except Roy Jinks, the S&W Historian. He wrote a book that offers substantial detail on the design of the Russian model titled "The History of Smith & Wesson." It does not get into the details of the font face and size. Charles W. Pate (still living) wrote "Smith and Wesson American Model in U.S. and Foreign Service" that may have relevant data for you since the 1st model Russian was essentially a modified American model. Lastly, you might want to post for help at the other S&W forum. A lot of the S&W Collectors Association members hang out there.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've went through and reverse ingenerred the whole thing down to top strap patent info is standard block font 1.5mm or 1/16". Russian model 1 on top strap and internal part numbering is stamped with American typewriter 1.5mm or 1/16" font. Serial number is stamped with 2.5mm or 1/8" American typewriter font.

I've also went through and complied a list of all the original screw and thread sizes for the entire gun I included lengths and shoulder diameters and head diameters as well. It's too much to list right now but I'll be listing all the info somewhere when I'm done. I feel like it's for sure gotta come in handy for someone else some day.
Handwriting Rectangle Font Material property Paper

Brown Handwriting Font Yellow Wood
 

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You might find this table from Gunsmithing Guns of the Old West, by Chicoine, to be helpful:

Font Parallel Number Pattern Paper
 
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Research is never wasted, IMO. However, I do recommend buying that book by Chicoine as well as another of his books Antique Firearm Assembly and Disassembly. I have the former in hardcover and the other in digital format. Digital is great because it can reside on laptops, tablets and smart phones as well as desktops. Useful when you need a reference while working on a gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Research is never wasted, IMO. However, I do recommend buying that book by Chicoine as well as another of his books Antique Firearm Assembly and Disassembly. I have the former in hardcover and the other in digital format. Digital is great because it can reside on laptops, tablets and smart phones as well as desktops. Useful when you need a reference while working on a gun.
I can't find it in digital the gunsmithing one anyways, just paper back and it's 90.00.

Oh and the trigger guard appears to be bronze, don't know if that effects anything according to plating or blueing..but I'm gonna find out .
 
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