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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My grandfather passed in December and I am currently in the process of getting his revolver back from the RCMP (evidence) I need to find out how old the revolver is and get a rough value in order to purchase it from the estate any help would be much appreciated


Model 29 Barrel 6 Fin B Stock Ts .44

Serial # AFRxxx


From what I have been able to find it seems to be Pre 1960 as after that everything was "29-" ?


Thanks !
 

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The N frame revolvers, including the model 29 had serial numbers beginning with the letter "S" from 1946 until 1969-70. After that the serial number would have began with an "N" until 1983.
In 1980 S&W began using serial numbers that began with 3 letters. The L frames were the first using the 3 letter prefix. The model 29 began using a 3 letter prefix in 1983 during production of the 29-3.
It can't be a no dash model 29 and have a 3 letter prefix serial number.
It also impossible to determine value without knowing the condition.
A like new in box M29 no dash could be worth over $1800, while a poor condition 29-3 might only be worth $250
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
no pictures as its still in evidence at the police station - which brings me to my next question, my grandfather used it to take his own life, does that effect the value of a firearm???
 

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no pictures as its still in evidence at the police station - which brings me to my next question, my grandfather used it to take his own life, does that effect the value of a firearm???
That's really rough - condolences on the loss of your grandfather. You seem to be pretty matter-of-fact, but it's also been 6 months... I tend to be pretty blunt so no offense intended if I am. I can have the bedside manner of Attila the Hun and the social sensitivity of Rainman...

To answer your question - only to the buyer all else being equal. I have a Colt Police Positive from 1929 with 2 notches on the grips. I have to presume it killed 2 people. I'd like to believe, from the position of the notches on the upper inside grip (for a right handed shooter) it was a cop's gun. So that actually adds mystique and maybe value.

To answer your question faithfully, I have to be blunt from here on out. So here goes....

All that is unless there is corrosion from blood on the gun. Unfortunately (and I don't mean to be callous here - please forgive, and again, condolences on the loss of your grandfather!!) suicides are messy. .44's don't help. If there was a lot of blood on the gun, then the finish could well be compromised. Be aware it might be pretty pitted. I think hemoglobin is a pretty good oxidizer. I somehow doubt the RCMP would have spent much time to clean it up much. Just a guess. InjunBro, who was in the 'smithing business for many years (30+?), I recall made mention of this once. Blued guns (and the box label says it's blued) will rust pretty badly with blood contact. Something he taught me.

If the gun was cleaned quickly, or your GF somehow insulated the gun, then only if a buyer knew of the death involved, and was squeamish, would the value be affected. Like people won't buy a house if someone died in it. That sort of thing.

Ultimately you're going to have to see the gun to know. Depending on who is executor, they may want to get rid of the thing, or they may want to milk every penny. Presuming they are just doing normal due diligence, and if the finish is compromised, then you can plead being in the family, and the defects (death, rust), to get it for a few hundred. Just guessing.

You might then want to get it refinished - it won't improve the value, and the gun will be worth perhaps no more than what you'd have invested in it, but it won't have the reminders from the rust splotches, and that might ease things...

Again, condolences. I know it's not an easy topic. I hope I haven't offended. God bless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
wow, Thank you for that response.
I am not sensitive about the subject, my grandfather did it as he had lived in pain for a long time and couldn't stand to see his sweetheart (grama) of 40 years in the condition she had been in for the last year after her stroke. he was a cowboy through and through and knew doing what he did was putting grama in the the best care possible etc.

I have a friend whom is a rcmp and informed me that the gun will be in the condition they received it in - not cleaned - I don't think there will be an over abundance of blood as he shot him self in the heart and the person that called it in called it as an elderly man sleeping on a park bench with a fire arm.

Thank you all for the responses and help very much appreciated, as soon as I receive the revolver I will post pictures!
 

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Welcome to the forum. Condolences for your grandfather. Hope you retrieve the .44 soon.
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! And my sincere condolences on the loss of your grandfather. Your gun was manufactured on the 348th day of 1984 --> Thursday, December 13, 1984. We can guestimate a value but it will be high as compared to other Canadian transactions I have observed which seem to be 1/2 to 2/3's of what a similar handgun sells for in the US. Your best bet on a value range is to check the completed auctions on http://gunbroker.com after you get the gun back and can estimate its condition. Another source is The Standard Catalog of S&W, 4th Edition, by Supica and Nahas.
 
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Welcome mate, sorry about your loss.

Thewelshm
 
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My condolences for your Grandfather, I certainly wouldn't blame anyone for ending the pain. In my years of gunsmithing I've seen 2 suicide guns, both had the inside of the barrels badly corroded from blood splatter. One was a Colt Python I could have bought for less than 1/2 the going price & the other was a Mauser rifle, in both cases I didn't see any profit in rebarreling them & passed. I don't blame the guns, they're inanimate objects, just like I lived in the house Grandma died in for over 10 years. Value would very likely be affected due to damage but if it was me I'd still want Grandpa's gun just because it was his. Knowing it ended his suffering would make it a bit better for me.
 

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I would try to recover the gun and keep it in the family. I wish it wasn't under the circumstances, but it sounds like you and your grandfather knew/know how to come to grips with matters of life that are hard. Good luck with your quest and please keep us posted on how it goes one way or the other.
 
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