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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had recently purchased a S&W Model 10-5 K-Frame secondhand from about 1969 (SN# D274624). It's internals were in great condition, like the ratcheting teeth on the extractor and the trigger. However, while dry firing with Snap Caps at home, I've apparently suffered a somewhat catastrophic failure as the cylinder failed to turn and was fast shut against the frame. I cannot bring the revolver to half-cock without personally moving the hand out of the way of the cylinder with the side plate off.

I have figured out that I need to have the Hammer Nose, and possibly the pin for the hammer nose replaced, as the broken tip of the hammer nose is now stuck in the hole that the nose normally travels through, freezing the cylinder in place.

I had first thought that the extractor rod was the problem, but I've narrowed it down to the Hammer nose by visual inspection.

Can I still contact Smith and Wesson Customer Service to get this problem Fixed? Or, will I have to find a traditional gunsmith to fix this? Here's some photos of the affected piece. If this thing is still under some degree of support, I'd be delighted to figure out or get some other help about this.

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She's taken a large amount of holster wear, but she's shoots almost like new.

With the Side plate off (Probably for the first time in decades) We can see where the problem lies.
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The offending chunk of hammer nose, resting in the channel, and jamming the Cylinder in place. One thing of note is that the Snap Cap inside has a spring loaded primer area.

Any little bit helps! I have limited tools at home, and I'm quite terrified of harming this lovely piece in any way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the help! I've gotten into contact with a gunsmith that people in my area trust. It's going to be a long drive to them there and back but I think it would be worth it once the Hammer Nose from Numrich gets to my place.
 

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It happens...but not often. S&W knew it was breakable so they designed it to be replaced. You may also need a hammer nose bushing. That's the pressed in piece in the recoil shield that your nose is broken off in. The gunsmith will know and can fix it as well if he has an hydraulic press.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You may also need a hammer nose bushing. That's the pressed in piece in the recoil shield that your nose is broken off in. The gunsmith will know and can fix it as well if he has an hydraulic press.
I did see the Hammer Nose Bushing on Numrich but I'm doubtful if my gunsmith has one in stock. I'd assume that any K-Frame revolver in the Model 10 range would have the same bushing, am I correct? I do not know how damaged the bushing may be since I can't get the cylinder out of the way to check it.
 

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If you take a long thin drill rod, you can, by going through the barrel and cylinder, tap the hammer nose back enough to open the cylinder. After that, it's easy enough to replace the nose itself.
Usually, if the bushing is scored, a gunsmith will just clean it up with a file. If you need a new one, any K frame one will work- they weren't model -specific.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you take a long thin drill rod, you can, by going through the barrel and cylinder, tap the hammer nose back enough to open the cylinder. After that, it's easy enough to replace the nose itself.
Usually, if the bushing is scored, a gunsmith will just clean it up with a file. If you need a new one, any K frame one will work- they weren't model -specific.
The trouble with that, however, is that there are Snap Caps inside the cylinder. Specifically, There are Tipton Brand snap Caps. Here is their listing: Amazon.com : Tipton Revolver Snap Caps .38 Special / .357 Magnum with False Primer and Reusable Construction for Dry-Firing, Practice and Safe Firearm Storage, 6 Pack : Hunting And Shooting Equipment : Sports & Outdoors

I'm quite thankful that this didn't happen with Live Ammo, but that will make extracting the piece of Hammer nose a real pain in the rear, both for me and the gunsmith.
 

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You can try it but my experience is they are too malleable (soft steel). Try a small nail instead. If you have some finishing nails, turn them around and put the head on the hammer nose then tap the pointed end. Also, if you have a Dremel, drill it out.
 

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Worth a try, but don't "wank" on it. You really don't want it jammed in there. Alternatively, you can slip a small metal cutting blade between the cylinder and recoil shield and saw the projection off (be very careful not to tear up the cylinder or recoil shield)
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Worth a try, but don't "wank" on it. You really don't want it jammed in there. Alternatively, you can slip a small metal cutting blade between the cylinder and recoil shield and saw the projection off (be very careful not to tear up the cylinder or recoil shield)
I do have the advantage that the primer area of the cap is spring loaded. Perhaps I can push it inward? The problem with that is due to the fact the Cylinder release will be unable to move with the hammer back far enough to access the pin in the first place.

I could also, with enough delicacy, perhaps remove the hammer so that I can push the cylinder release without the hammer getting in the way. I have absolutely minimal tools available to me to try and fix this. I'd also never forgive myself if I screw this up myself and cause even more trouble.
 

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I would take the hammer out if you can get it back far enough to clear. With the nose broken off, it may not take much. When you remove the side plate, don't mix up the screws. The lower forward yoke screw MUST go back into its hole. Remove the main spring first, then the hammer. You should get access to the rear of the hammer bushing and be able to work on it. The worst you can do is bugger up the hammer nose bushing and they're replaceable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I would take the hammer out if you can get it back far enough to clear. With the nose broken off, it may not take much. When you remove the side plate, don't mix up the screws. The lower forward yoke screw MUST go back into its hole. Remove the main spring first, then the hammer. You should get access to the rear of the hammer bushing and be able to work on it.
I have a piece of cardboard with a fun little outline of the sideplate and surrounding points of interest so that I can always know where exactly the screws came from.
 

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With minimal skill set, and no tools - why not take it to an experienced gunsmith?

This threat is becoming torturous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
With minimal skill set, and no tools - why not take it to an experienced gunsmith?

This threat is becoming torturous.
Well I'm most likely going to do just that. The guy's very busy, my Numrich parts are over 2 weeks away from arriving at my place, and the guy's nearly 2 hours away. It will be an ordeal, but I think a Gunsmith is my best bet. Thank you all for the input!
 

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Just had mine replaced on my 66-2. Gunsmith did it. Mine didn't involve anything but the hammer nose. Oh and..Welcome to the forum!
 
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