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The first hunt I did was in 1976 and I used a borrowed rifle. It was .270 caliber and I distinctly recall it was made my Smith and Wesson. I don't think I have ever seen another since.

A brief internet search on bolt rifles yielded some information, but not much. They were some what of an experiment by the company that didn't go far.
 

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S&W never actually manufactured their own rifles. The most recent ones (1500 line) were made by Howa of Japan. Some early ones were made by Husqvarna of Sweden.

Howa also made most of the Weatherby line.

Howa rifles has since set up their own US distributorship.
 

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The first hunt I did was in 1976 and I used a borrowed rifle. It was .270 caliber and I distinctly recall it was made my Smith and Wesson. I don't think I have ever seen another since.

A brief internet search on bolt rifles yielded some information, but not much. They were some what of an experiment by the company that didn't go far.
I own one, an early 60's S&W branded Husquvarna built bolt rifle and it is a shooter. Beautiful piece and very collectable. S&W never built a bolt gun themselves.

View attachment 279609 View attachment 279617

Target is at 250 yards. Very respectable for an 'antique' bolt rifle..

No, it's not for sale either....:D

Well, maybe if the price was right, I might consider it. After all, money talks.
 

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they only had Smith Wesson stamped on them. They were not produced by Smith Wesson but by Howa of Japan or Husqvarna of Sweeden.. They had a license to use the name and brand. They were so so rifles.
 

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they only had Smith Wesson stamped on them. They were not produced by Smith Wesson but by Howa of Japan or Husqvarna of Sweeden.. They had a license to use the name and brand. They were so so rifles.
Layne..

Maybe the Howa's were but the Husky's were always shooters. Husky built a fine line of rifles, the one I own has a hand lapped, engine turned bolt that is smooth as butter, fantastic furniture and a cold forged, button rifled tube. The only negative I can find (and it shoots sub moa at 250 (see target) minus the first shot flyer on a clean bore, is the trigger. The trigger is clunky but fixable. It's getting a ball bearing match trigger this summer which will fix it's only detraction.

Being a wood stock, I'd not hunt with it, I prefer a carbon fiber stock, but for a fine example of Swedish craftsmanship it's hard to beat. It a Paul Mauser small action with claw exrtractor btw.

Any bone stock 30 caliber stick that will shoot sub moa at 250 yards in my view is a darn good rifle.

Most rifles sold today that are deemed 'accurate' by the manufacturer are gauged at 100 yards, not 250. That extra 150 yards separates the real shooters from the wannabe shooters.
 

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Here to tell you, the triggers are not adjustable for pre-travel, release or pull, but mine is a dead wringer for the one in your picture, right down to the Monte Carlo stock.
 

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I own one, an early 60's S&W branded Husquvarna built bolt rifle and it is a shooter. Beautiful piece and very collectable. S&W never built a bolt gun themselves.

View attachment 279609 View attachment 279617

Target is at 250 yards. Very respectable for an 'antique' bolt rifle..

No, it's not for sale either....:D

Well, maybe if the price was right, I might consider it. After all, money talks.
Your picture is not working for me, :confused:
 

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Additionally, the Howa made 1500 was also sold as the Mossberg 1500.

In 1985, Mossberg purchased the parts inventory and importing rights from Smith & Wesson, when S&W decided to drop rifles from their catalog.
 

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For anyone interested in buying one..there is a 1500 in .308 on the blue site for sale (classifieds)
Asking price? I bet it's not what I paid for mine in unfired condition.... I paid 300 bucks for mine. Had preservative in the tube (that I had a helluva time getting out).
 

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It's listed at $1100. That ad for me has some confusion. It's listed as NIB which to me would be unfired. Also stated is it's a 'tack driver',if he didn't fire it how can he know it's a tack driver. I've been watching for one in 223 or 243Win.

I've seen 308s' and 30-06s' at gun shows in the range of 700-800,always tempting to have 1500 but they didn't have the recall rework mark.
 

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It's listed at $1100. That ad for me has some confusion. It's listed as NIB which to me would be unfired. Also stated is it's a 'tack driver',if he didn't fire it how can he know it's a tack driver. I've been watching for one in 223 or 243Win.

I've seen 308s' and 30-06s' at gun shows in the range of 700-800,always tempting to have 1500 but they didn't have the recall rework mark.
Most people don't know a 'tack driver' from a paper clip anyway. $1100 is way too high unless there is someone who had a fat wallet and wants a maybe collectable at some point long gun. Sounds to me like he's blowing stale wind. Maybe worth 5 on a good day. NIB and 'tack driver (whatever that refers to) is contradictory.

It took some serious load building to get mine to shoot sub-sub MOA at 200 yards, but then, that is what I do. Mine will shoot better than I can (Off the bench) but then that isn't a big deal. I don't know anyone that can shoot distance with any accuracy with a rifle shouldered. Timney makes a nice drop in trigger for them, takes some inletting of the stock but it's not evident unless you take the stock off and look inside. Huber also has a trigger but the Timney is less expensive and removes all the 60's trigger issues.

Certainly is not a hunting rifle in the sense of the word. Wood furniture don't lend itself to being durable and wood tends to absorb moisture which causes the POI to change as the fore end puts pressure on the barrel and in stock form the barrel is not free floated (as was the norm in the 60's). I could have modified mine and bedded the action but I didn't as it shoots fine as it is but I'd never take it to the woods anyway.
 

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I'm a Remington 700 person although I do look for S&W 1500s' at gun shows, and I reworked 3 700s'. A 700BDL 17Rem,a 700ADL 6mmRem,and a 700ADL 30-06. After shooting them 'stock', all three were glass bedded and free floated, all 3 improved. When I eventually get a 1500, I will do the same to it. I reload, since the 70s', and always experiment with projectiles and powder. I'm not a hunter, just a paper shooter.
 

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Not me. I like to kill game animals and then eat them. Keep in mind that modifying any S&W branded bolt action stick, other than a trigger will depreciate it's value. I'm not 1 700 Remington fan. 700 clone maybe but not a factory 700. Has to be the most copied action out there and most spin off's are much better than the factory version. Only time I punch paper is load building or getting my optics set. Then I'll build a hundred rounds and put the gun in the cabinet (cleaned and oiled) until I need it. Get it out, foullthe barrel and check the accuracy and go hunting.

Far as actions go, I find the Savage action to be superior and the Savage competition accurtrigger (red release) as well. Just personal preference. 95% of all rifles can outshoot their owners anyway. On bedding, I much prefer a machined bedding block over glass bedding. In fact, John Manners built me a stock in CF with a machined bedding block and it has his initials on it. Beautiful piece of work and blends right in with the stock whereas glass bedding always looks cobbly.
 
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