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Hi everyone,

This is likely a stupid question, but I thought I would ask anyways.

For S&W revolvers (such as the 586), after you load the cylinder and push it back into the frame, which direction should you rotate the cylinder into place? Clockwise or Counter-clockwise? I see both being done in videos. Does one direction lead to a smoother double action?

-AdamARM
 

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It shouldnt matter. I dont know that I do it the same each time and have never noticed a difference.
 

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Don’t rotate it. Have cylinder in left hand with a chamber top center. Then push cylinder closed. If you’re holding your mouth right while closing it, the bolt stop will have cylinder locked in place once closed. May take a time or two to get the hang of it. That way will help prevent a turn ring around the cylinder. A turn ring is a slender ring around cylinder where the finish is worn.

Joe
 

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No matter which way
 

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Well you asked a good question and got all good answers. Jace has the best answer which considers and accommodates all needs.

If you want a particular chamber under the firing pin, empty or whatever, still align that chamber at the top for the cyl stop to align with cyl notch at the bottom, before closing cyl.
 

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...when firing a double action S&W the cylinder should rotate counter clockwise, a Colt double action should rotate clockwise.
 

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You would be a lot more careful how you close the cylinder, if your first couple rounds were ratshot. Be sure to close the cylinder using both hands,one cradling the pistol, one on the cylinder. GENTLY guide the cylinder into the proper position. Firmly close it. Start slapping the cylinder shut, with a flick of the wrist, like a Mannix re-run, and when you bend the crane, your revolver will wind up in the pawn shop, under "somebody else's problem, for sale" like all the other revolvers with flexed cranes.
 

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I was taught in the police academy not to close my Model 10 with the cylinder, always use the yoke. I never asked why and still don't know why to this day, I just did it. One of the the other things (among many) Sergeant Otto Black taught us was not to worry about or waste time indexing the cylinder after it was closed, it would fire whether or not the cylinder was locked in with a round under the hammer or not (for the purposes of an emergency reload). Apart from that, I guess I've always rotated it CCW.
 

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I was taught in the police academy not to close my Model 10 with the cylinder, always use the yoke. I never asked why and still don't know why to this day, I just did it. One of the the other things (among many) Sergeant Otto Black taught us was not to worry about or waste time indexing the cylinder after it was closed, it would fire whether or not the cylinder was locked in with a round under the hammer or not (for the purposes of an emergency reload). Apart from that, I guess I've always rotated it CCW.
You know... I must be conditioned from semi auto's to listen for the click. Didnt really think about it until you mentioned it but of course it still would work if you didnt index it but it never would have crossed my mind to do it. Even when I practice with my speedloader I always index. Just funny how the head works. In the end it would mess with my head to holster my revolver not having heard the click so I think I am stuck! :)
 

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The answer depends on which company made the gun. Colt and S&W revolver cylinders turn in different directions (likely because of patent issues).

If you look a the engagement groove for each cylinder that engages with the cylinder stop, you'll see the half oval shaped area machined in front of the slot. That is the direction to turn your cylinder.

You could initially index the stop into the groove in either direction, but I train for consistency, and so rotate it in the direction that the gun itself rotates the cylinder.

Rotation.jpg
 

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As I like to minimize turn lines I hold the cylinder with thumb and finger and align a chamber on top. Snick and it's locked in. If I don't have a full cylinder, same thing but the first loaded chamber is to the right of the barrel (gun facing away, and it's a S&W). The "Jace method". Never, ever, slap/ flick etc. a cylinder closed.
 
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