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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought my first rock climbing rope it's an Edelrid Python 10mm and It just arrived by mail today and the rope package is writing about what should be used and isn't the top rope one of them because it is 9.7 and not thicker? I'm sure it would be fine, but I wonder and it would also lead to climbing, after which is it okay to turn from above?
 

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Spent more hours than I ever care to count climbing trees for a arborist outfit. Started w/ hemp ropes then moved on to various other more specialized ropes. Regardless of the name brand or size or anything else, you need to be cold blooded about what you are hanging on and as well when you retire the rope from climbing. In our work, the problem was not rocks but saws and odd ball bits of wire, etc. that were commonly found in old trees. Keep a close eye on your ropes for any more than superficial damage. A rope that has been subjected to bruising, had fibers crushed, is suspect. Use knots that are well tied and keep in mind the loss of strength that results from any knot and especially from knots/hitches poorly chosen/used. Change the working end of the rope daily. Keep the ropes you use clean as grit, etc. can play hob with a rope. I still have a single rope from years ago that I occasionally use. Don't remember anything about brand, etc. But, when I was climbing a lot of trees, it was what we used for lowering heavy wood. I am comfortable using it for my climbing line in a tree. Sincerely. bruce.
 

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Spent more hours than I ever care to count climbing trees for a arborist outfit. Started w/ hemp ropes then moved on to various other more specialized ropes. Regardless of the name brand or size or anything else, you need to be cold blooded about what you are hanging on and as well when you retire the rope from climbing. In our work, the problem was not rocks but saws and odd ball bits of wire, etc. that were commonly found in old trees. Keep a close eye on your ropes for any more than superficial damage. A rope that has been subjected to bruising, had fibers crushed, is suspect. Use knots that are well tied and keep in mind the loss of strength that results from any knot and especially from knots/hitches poorly chosen/used. Change the working end of the rope daily. Keep the ropes you use clean as grit, etc. can play hob with a rope. I still have a single rope from years ago that I occasionally use. Don't remember anything about brand, etc. But, when I was climbing a lot of trees, it was what we used for lowering heavy wood. I am comfortable using it for my climbing line in a tree. Sincerely. bruce.
Did a ton of that when I was much younger. Still have my Klein harness hanging in the garage as well as my climbing spurs. Mostly used hemp but switched to synthetic towards the end. Myself, I would imagine it's a heck of a lot cheaper buying synthetic cordage from an arborist supply house than buying climbing rope from some rock climbing concern that is most likely buying bulk cordage from those supply houses anyway and reselling it.

I still use synthetic cordage on my winches. Lots easier to deal with than alloy steel wire rope.
 

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Rock climbing? With a rope?

Highest I've been was about 400 feet at Yosemite- didn't need a rope. (???)
 

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Not me dont even like climbing ladders. When a kid on Petty Jean mtn I crawled under a fence and sat on edge of a cliff. My dad eased up behind and pulled me back by my britches and then gave them a good dusting.
 

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All my STATIC rope is 7/16" PMC. I have pieces 125' to 350'. I only have 1 piece of Dynamic. It's 125' but I can't remember anything else about it.

When I lost most of my right lung in 1996, that put the halt on my climbing or rescue work.
 
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