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I've recent inherited an old Smith and Wesson .22 revolver, after research I'm pretty sure it is what's known as a K-22.
Serial: K 497##

Any information you could give on the pistol regarding the images and serial number would be much appreciated.


The bigger problem that I have is the gun is unable to fire because of it cylinder, it appears to have been dry fired and damage to the cylinder no longer allows ammunition to fit. You can see the damage done to the cylinder in the images. So, as far as getting this thing up and running again, what all would be involved with fixing the cylinder?

Also, any tips on refurbishing this gun would also be appreciated.
Thanks for your time.
 

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Clean up the recesses for the rims of the .22 cartridge with a Dremel tool. The indents on the cylinder are between the chambers, also. I would think that it is seriously 'out of time'. Now, at least, you can see if it will fire. Bob
 

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welcome01

What a shame, that is a nice gun. I'm not an expert, but if it was me, I would use a reamer to get it back to being a "shooter" or you could have it restored by S&W. Not sure how much that would cost or if they would even do it.
 

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First of all welcome01 to the Forum.

Second, a couple of things stand out on your revolver that indicate some serious issues that need to be addressed. With all the peen marks made by the firing pin all around the cylinder tells me that the cylinder stop has either been removed, broken, or gummed up to the point that it no longer holds the cylinder in proper alignment with the barrel. Also indicated by the lack of a turn line on the cylinder. There is also a screw missing that holds the side plate in place. Without a complete disassembly and inspection by a competent gunsmith I would make no attempt to fire this revolver under any circumstances.
 

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This one in it's current condition is dangerous. The timing is shot (Pardon the pun). I'm with RD, I'll bet the cylinder stop is broken.

Please DO NOT Attempt to shoot his in it's current condition. If you do and the cylinder and barrel aren't lined up correctly you risk a very strong chance of a KABOOM, and that's not good.

The first thing you should do is to go onto gunbroker.com or eBay, and search for a K-22 cylinder to replace the one that's there. It should cost somewhere around $50-100 with shipping. You might get lucky and find one for less. I picked up a Stainless cylinder on eBay for one of my revolvers for only $40 and that included shipping.
After you have the replacement cylinder in hand I'd take it to a qualified gunsmith (Not some backyard shadetree gunsmith either) and have it gone thru it top to bottom. Have him replace the cylinder and re-blue it. If you let us know what part of the country you live in the odds are in your favor that one of us can recommend a good gunsmith to you that's in your area. Your home city would be the best information, otherwise get us close with a geographical proximity. Finding a gunsmith in your area will save you a fair bit of money because you won't have to ship it (VERY expensive), and you can build a relationship with somebody that will help you when you need it. Get an estimate for the repairs and then you can decide if you want to keep it or if you'll sell it off because the cost exceeds the value.
It shouldn't cost too much to fix it, because it's one of the most common and favorite S&W revolvers out there. Parts are available almost everywhere.

Regards,
Gearchecker
 

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Welcome Teddy. There is a gunsmith in North Carolina whose specialty is older S&W revolvers. The factory recommends him for work on older models they won't work on anymore. His name is David Chicoine. He has written several books, and contributed on our go-to reference book, The Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson. Turn-around times are several months, but his work is highly regarded. You said you inherited the gun, so if you plan on keeping it and not fixing it to sell, you might consider Dave. You will have a lot of time and money invested in it, but it will be something you too can leave to your young'ins. One last note, if anyone ever asks why you shouldn't "dry-fire" a .22...show 'em that picture. Hard8
 

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Hey Ted,

Welcome to S&W.

You have been given great advice.

Later, Mark
 
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