Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Are these things a NoNo for 1911s?

I found a packet of these recoil buffers in a box of reloading stuff I bought recently. I used them in the past and felt they prevented some wear and tear - but quit for some reason and forgot about them.

xtm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
898 Posts
They can't hurt..I just wouldn't keep them in a carry gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,839 Posts
Xtm I've used them when shooting hard ball, they do help in reduced wear. But for target loads they are a waste of time. You will all so get more fail to feed problems with them. :)
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
God (John Moses Browning) didn't use them.... :eek:

Prolly figuring out what spring rate to use for the load your shooting would be a better approach. I've thrown them all away in my guns....

It is subject to much debate and if your shooting a target or competition gun it becomes a factor. But for normal CCW or home protection, maybe not so needed....

giz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Copy & pasted from "Modifying the 1911" by John Higginbotham...... What about recoil shock buffers. Well, I have experimented with these for years and was on hand when the Wilson version was invented – or at lest conceived. I can see the logic in this but over the years I have gradually gotten away from using them in my serious self defense guns. I do use them in my practice guns just to be on the safe side. The problem is, and it is different with each individual gun, that these things can get chewed up and spread out and cause the gun to become unreliable. This is a bad thing in a defense gun. I was having trouble with a Wilson Combat Master ( this was a $1500 pistol in 1985) running with ball ammo and McCormick magazines. Now the gun was good, the mags were good, the ammo was Winchester ball and the gun was clean when I started shooting it. Oiling the barrel hood made it run better but it still choked. I did not discover the problem until I got home. The shock-buff was smashed and a bit of it was pushing upwards on the underside of the barrel. Needles to say, that gun no longer carries a shock-buff. Yet they seem to work in some other guns. What is really needed is a sort of "sandwich" which has steel in front buffer in-between and steel in the back so that it won’t get chewed. However this can all interfere with the reward travel of the slide and the odds of the slide locking back on the last shot – especially on a Commander. Shock buffs may save your gun from battering if you shoot 1,000 rounds a week but it may also cause problems – buyer beware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for the replies! :)

I've tweaked my 1911 to where it runs 100% with factory ball and my handloads that duplicate factory ball. Better that I just leave things where they are and not add another variable.

I might install one if I know that I'm getting ready to be shooting up a half-case of ammo or so for training or some high-volume situation like that.

xtm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I've been shooting 1911's since the very early 70's and never used them.
One old timer once told me that they were junk, he was also my firearms instructor.
You will not find them in any of his 1911's nor mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
The Lord God did not intend them in his original holy pistol design which was transmitted to mankind through his prophet John Moses Browning to be the right arm of the free world!
Putting shock buffers in your 1911 is akin to Adam and Eve eating from the forbidden tree. Just say no.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
Each to there own, but I don't have any use for them.

I tried them in my Colt Series 70 LW Commander and all they did was get chewed up and cause jams. j;zn;
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
Gizamo said:
God (John Moses Browning) didn't use them.... :eek:
No, nor did he make 1911's out of Aluminum either.

I think they make sense in any gun you're gonna shoot alot, particularly ones built with non-carbon steel frames.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,839 Posts
Drew I'm just curious how many aluminum guns do you own. After following your post's you don't seem like an aluminum kind of guy to me. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
c pierce said:
Drew I'm just curious how many aluminum guns do you own. After following your post's you don't seem like an aluminum kind of guy to me. :)
Dr. Pierce.... I actually own several Aluminum Framed Guns including, but not limited to S&W 37's, a 42, 43's, 12's, a 442, 39's, 59's, and a Para Ord P-14 (which has a Recoil Buffer, BTW).

:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,839 Posts
Sebago Son said:
[quote="c pierce":3gl5pxgc]Drew I'm just curious how many aluminum guns do you own. After following your post's you don't seem like an aluminum kind of guy to me. :)
Dr. Pierce.... I actually own several Aluminum Framed Guns including, but not limited to S&W 37's, a 42, 43's, 12's, a 442, 39's, 59's, and a Para Ord P-14 (which has a Recoil Buffer, BTW).

:D[/quote:3gl5pxgc] I'm so disillusioned, I thought I knew you better than that. :mrgreen:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
c pierce said:
[quote="Sebago Son":7fp0byr4][quote="c pierce":7fp0byr4]Drew I'm just curious how many aluminum guns do you own. After following your post's you don't seem like an aluminum kind of guy to me. :)
Dr. Pierce.... I actually own several Aluminum Framed Guns including, but not limited to S&W 37's, a 42, 43's, 12's, a 442, 39's, 59's, and a Para Ord P-14 (which has a Recoil Buffer, BTW).

:D[/quote:7fp0byr4] I'm so disillusioned, I thought I knew you better than that. :mrgreen:[/quote:7fp0byr4]

I've been trying to widen my horizons for over 50 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
Getting back to buffs, on another forum some guy was debating me that they are great and some special forces unit is supplied with them. I can't find proof of the special forces part but like many of you, I won't use them.

If in time the frame cracks, (if you shoot it that much) just buy another gun. I have several pistols, so I don't think I will crack a frame in my limited life time. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,761 Posts
Back in the 1980's there was quite a bit of debate in 1911 circles regarding aluminum vs. steel framed durability.

At the end of it all the bottom line was eventually they all will crack given enough rounds down range.

I put about 8,000 rounds of hot (950 fps) hard cast 230 gr RNL reloads through my aluminum framed circa 1984 Colt Commander before it's frame cracked on it's rail right above the rear of the slide lock.

I cut the offending piece out with a dremel, poslished the both sides of the cut and continued to shoot it for several more years before trading it. 20+ years later it's new owner is still shooting it.

...and I still won't use shock buffs. okfvnail
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I don't recommend them for Personal defence.I remember back in the 80s when the 38 Super was king in IPSC,They were used to stop the battering of the frame.The hot loads used and the lightening of the slide and lighter spring would speed up the slide so it cycled faster and harder.When I was building the 38 Supers the trick was to put 2 of these in which would cushion the slides impact and also make it cycle faster.They wouldn't last long though,They would split or in some cases just shatter.They do work for competition(What they were designed for)if changed after every match.Like I said,I would not use them in any gun I carried for defence.

Ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
If you are destroying shock buffs that fast, your recoil spring is too light for the load you are using or your shock buffs are soft like chewing gum. Straight wound springs are better than variable for full power stock guns. I can shoot a whole season of IPSC on one shock buff in my 1911 40 cal Para limited gun. In my Colt 45 ACP single stack i've done it also, firing several thousand rounds. I like to use CP shock buffs. They are harder than many others on the market, and they last a long time. Many will not use them on duty or carry guns figuring on "Murphy's Law" happening. But for expensive sporting guns firing many thousands of rounds they are worth it, extending service life, in my opinion.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top