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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anybody identify this one. Let's have a little fun with guns for a while.
I know what it is, let's see if somebody here can identify it from what few photos I have of it. I even know the complete history on it.
Do you have one to share that might puzzle us as well? Let's see what's out there.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You guys are right for the most part. It's a low wall.
The cool part is it's chambered in 22 short. Pretty unique. I asked my gunsmith once if he could re-chamber it for 22LR, and he told me not to, because it'll destroy the value if it just the way it is.
 

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I'll play. Here is one that falls into the category of "looks can be deceiving"! This one dates to just after the great war of secession (1861-1865). And, it's NOT a Remington! Good luck
Hmmm... that's a poser. Not a Whitney. I'd guess one of the Scandinavian rolling blocks made under the Remington patent.
Nice rifle, whatever it is!

John
 

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I'll play. Here is one that falls into the category of "looks can be deceiving"! This one dates to just after the great war of secession (1861-1865). And, it's NOT a Remington! Good luck
Hint #3, it is chambered for the U.S. 50-70 cartridge and the hammer automatically drops into the safety notch when the breach block is opened.
 

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Springfield made rolling block.

Kevin
Right on! It is a Springfield Model 1871 Army rifle. There was also a Navy model made in 1870. This is one of 10,001 that were made. After the Army bought what they wanted, there were about 1000 left over that were sold on the civilian market. I believe this to be one of the civilian guns!
 

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Right on! It is a Springfield Model 1871 Army rifle.
That I should have known! :rolleyes:

I have a New York State Militia Model roller. It has the same safety feature but has three barrel bands.
Remington made tons of military rifles on their #1 action and licensed out tons more to foreign manufacturers. I guess in my mind they are all Remington rolling blocks.:)

John
 

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That I should have known! :rolleyes:

I have a New York State Militia Model roller. It has the same safety feature but has three barrel bands.
Remington made tons of military rifles on their #1 action and licensed out tons more to foreign manufacturers. I guess in my mind they are all Remington rolling blocks.:)

John
I think that I read somewhere that Springfield Armory paid Remington $1.00 per rifle royalty fees! Of course, in 1872 the rifles probably only cost the Army $20 or less each!
 

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Ok, here is another one. This is a .22 conversion made to look like a Thompson SMG. The challenge is to guess what the original make of the rifle was! Good luck.
machine 1.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
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Ruger 10/22 was the original rifle. The trigger group is the give-a-way.
 

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Here's one for your thoughts
I think that is an Evans rifle. If I remember correctly, it fired a unique 44 caliber round and had a large capacity magazine in the butt stock (24-28 rds). They were "famous" for jamming and fell out of favor fairly quickly. Made from 1873-1879 or thereabouts.

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