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Some of you might remember me posting about these a while back. My brothers friend's Dad purchased these new around 1954. My brother and I were supposed to purchase them. Without getting into too many details, the barrels on both of these guns have been hammered closed at the crown. I had them in my hand before they were damaged and they are well used but not abused. They were working guns. I spoke to my brother’s friend the other day and let him know I still wanted them and he said I could have them when the time comes. I am not counting my chickens yet, but I think they would be perfect for me to "play" with. For the pre 36 I would just get a new barrel and depending how close the finish is to the original it would probably stay as is. I love the classic look of a 4inch M&P but I was thinking about making it a 2 in. I also intend to take these apart myself to learn all I can. So here are some questions for you experts out there.

How much do you guys think making these mods would cost and would it even be worth it?

Are barrels for these easily found?

Would it be cost effective to pick up a frame wrench and do it myself? I am very mechanically inclined and have access to a lot of tools such as a lathe and milling machines.

Has anyone every made a frame wrench?

Any suggestions will be appreciated!

Thanks!







 

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Hammered Closed At The Crown? Geeeeez. Somebody Git A Rope!

This isn't too tough of a job Dom. I've done it several times successfully and I never used a barrel wrench.

These are pretty common barrels and I bet that the amount of closefitting you'll have to do is minimal. Th trick is to find components from the same serail range or era.

If you get these guns, drop me a line and I'll see what I can to to hook you up with some tubes.... I've still got a number of them left over from when I was parting out guns prior to being destroyed by the RIDPS.

If nothing else, it will be a great learning experience.

Drew
 

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Excellent Drew!! Thanks!!

I figure the barrels would probably be loosened up a bit after he hit them with a hammer and might come out easy!! l;gmna;

I picked up a ton of information from you guys over the years and if I am lucky, the cylinder gap will be good, .004 to .009, if it is too big it should be shimmed, and if too tight the forcing cone will have to milled. Do they make a tool to mill the forcing cone? Or can it be filed down with extreme care to keep it square and then ream it back to specs? Do I have that right?

Like I said, I'm not counting my chickens yet, but it is looking like a good chance I will get them and as you said it will be a good learning experience.
 

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Shaun.

Rhode Island Dept. Public Safety... State Police.

Every couple of years they used to gather up all the "Crime Guns" and burn them up at a forge. This event usually coincided with an Election Cycle so some corrupt, media hungry moron Democrat (I know, redundant) could make a speech, and get his photo taken "getting these guns off the streets...". Mostly they were suicides or abandoned property. I used to get the chance to strip and pick the ones that came into our Property Room.
 

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Hi Hunter.

I never made a frame wrench, but I'm sure it can be done quite easily. Make sure that the frame is solid with no chance of twisting, and you will be fine. The barrel is pinned so there should not be a lot of torque on it.

You will need basic stuff, like good screwdrivers, a pin punch for the barrel, files, stones, feeler gauge for the air gap & a strap wrench to turn the barrel. Brownells has all the stuff but you could spend over 1,000 bucks for tooling alone, so improvise all you can.
I don't have barrels but I'm sure they can be found without too much trouble. I have links on suppliers in that faq sticky if you need barrels and parts.

I wouldn't spend a lot on them as if you sell them you may only get $250 at a gun/pawn shop.
I think doing the job would be a excellent learning experience and I say do it! Because you have access to a lathe and milling machine you have nothing to loose except the money you put into it. So just spend as cheap as you can in tooling, then if you really need to purchase something it won't be that big of a deal.
 

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Thanks 500!!
 
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