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Discussion Starter #1
I stopped by a lgs yesterday for some blackpowder.
There was a pretty nice SA M1 on the counter. Really got me thinking about the one I had. I sold it about 8 years ago. I hadn't shot it since I had it, a friend wanted it, so i let it go. Wasn't a good decision.

The one i saw yesterday is a little pricey at 1500.
I'm thinking of going back today and take a good look at. I did check GB, seems a lot sell around 1k.
Is 1500 an ok price, if it's all SA parts?

Then i found some CMP M1 on GB.
Would a certified M1 from CMP be a better gun?
I'm thinking a CMP rifle would be a good shooting rifle.

I have read about the schuester gas plug to.

Opinions?
Anything that needs special attention.
Common things that could break?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I did go yesterday and look at that rifle. It's a decent rifle. But the lgs couldn't tell me a chamber or barrel gauge reading. Then I mentioned a cmp rifle. Well that was a mistake. He kinda got bent out of shape. Told me there a hodge podge of parts and a mutt of sorts, and his rifle was an original. So I pulled the OP rod back and said, it's a 1950 barrel. Then he said well yeah, they all have been refurbished. Yeah, I know that, 2 wars, ofcourse.
I left there. I didnt appreciate him digging down on a cmp gun. I realize a non- cmp rifle would be worth more to a collector. I'm not a collector. Just rubbed me the wrong way. I get he was just trying to sell his rifle, but I think that could have been done without downing a cmp rifle.
So today I put a cmp M1 Garand on layaway. Should be a fine example for me. It's all SA parts except the trigger guard. I'd hardly call that a hodge podge. Chamber and bore measure 1+. Serial is 3.7 million.
That should put it around 1945, if I remember right. I should have it in a month. This time I'm keeping it and not selling and I'm gonna shoot it.
Lesson learned, I'm not selling anything anymore.
 

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That sounds like a LGS that knew what he has was overpriced, and that an informed customer was standing in front of him.

I've had similar things happen at gun shows when I ask to see an overpriced Luger and they know I have some background.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That sounds like a LGS that knew what he has was overpriced, and that an informed customer was standing in front of him.

I've had similar things happen at gun shows when I ask to see an overpriced Luger and they know I have some background.
I think he is on the upper end for what he has. It was the bad mouthing of what cmp does that did me in.
What he should have done, is explained how his rifle will always be worth more versus a cmp. That would have been a better explanation.
From my reading, these rifles are strong and tough. I read yesterday of a Korean war vet who earned CMH using a M1. He fired so many rounds the upper hand guard starting burning. He put it out with the snow. 3 separate times.
To me, that's a freaking tough rifle. I'll be happy to have an example.
 

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Join a CMP associated club( The Garand Collector's Assoc. for example) and order you rifle(s) directly from the CMP. Better rifles(throat and muzzle erosion will be measured and noted on the tag) and WAY BETTER prices. Most all Garands and Carbines originally came from the CMP(formerly the DCM). I have 2 garands and 2 carbines that I went Annistion, AL.(south store CMP) and bought of their racks. I'd never buy one from an individual or GS unless the price was extremely low and I could take it down and look at it. Currently the CMP has rack grade M1's for $650 and service grades for $750. Visit their site to learn more.
 

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It's almost been amusing that the mainstream media and politicians are so prejudiced against black rifles (like AR-15s and other modern sporting rifle pattern guns) but completely ignore the much more powerful M1 Garand battle rifle and most of the Eastern Block AK pattern rifles.

We have been approaching the end of M1 Garand availability from the CMP for some time. Here's the current listing:

M1 Garand - Civilian Marksmanship ProgramCivilian Marksmanship Program

They still have some Field Grade rifles for $650 Service Grade rifles currently priced at $750, probably from a batch recently returned to the USA from Philippines.

If you can get to Anniston, Port Clinton or one of the CMP Games events they often have rifles there that you can inspect and select right off the sales floor. This is how I got the best of mine including a six digit receiver (one of the early Garands).

This one is a CMP rebuilt "Special" from a few years ago. Tight and clean as brand new, and ideal for competition.

M1GarandSpecial_Fullside.jpg
 

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If you are buying a Garand to shoot and enjoy, a CMP rifle is fine. If you shoot it and something breaks or wears out, it can be repaired without harm to its value. If it is a collector grade rifle with all the original parts then I hope you have a thick wallet and don't want to shoot it.
 

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It's almost been amusing that the mainstream media and politicians are so prejudiced against black rifles (like AR-15s and other modern sporting rifle pattern guns) but completely ignore the much more powerful M1 Garand battle rifle and most of the Eastern Block AK pattern rifles.

We have been approaching the end of M1 Garand availability from the CMP for some time. Here's the current listing:

M1 Garand - Civilian Marksmanship ProgramCivilian Marksmanship Program

They still have some Field Grade rifles for $650 Service Grade rifles currently priced at $750, probably from a batch recently returned to the USA from Philippines.

If you can get to Anniston, Port Clinton or one of the CMP Games events they often have rifles there that you can inspect and select right off the sales floor. This is how I got the best of mine including a six digit receiver (one of the early Garands).

This one is a CMP rebuilt "Special" from a few years ago. Tight and clean as brand new, and ideal for competition.

View attachment 338201 [/QUOTEO

One of mine is a CMP special. Its an H&R with CMP wood. It looks new as if it was never issued.
 

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Hey Skwirl

I got my M1 Garand from the DCM back in the early 80's. Serial number 3678278 puts it at March 1945.
I have a Schuster plug that I use when firing some of the surplus ammo that I acquired back in the 70's
just to be safe..excess pressure could bend the operating arm. I never reloaded for my Garand as I had
quite a bit of surplus 30-06 that me and a couple of friends went together and bought..still have about
5 to 6 thousand rds, mostly Lake City. All of my surplus rifles get shot..that's what they are made for.;)
As a side note..when I bought my M1 you got the luck of the draw..took about 9 months after all of the
paper work was sent in..the upside is that the cost was $179. Ain't nothing wrong with a CMP rifle as
they all went to an arsenal..mine has the stamp BA..Benecia Arsenal in California.


Dick
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I very much appreciate and thank all who posted their opinions.
I'm going to start a new thread on my rifle, maybe it'll help someone in the future. Many thanks to all.
 

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My dad got a M-1 Garand in the 80's. According to what I found it is a 1941. He's never shot it and never will. It came with several crates of Lake City ammo that dates to 1940 according to the lot number. I have opened one can. It was hard to open and it made a sucking sound. Bandoliers, and 8rd clips. Card board over the tips. This stuff looks good.

So there is a possibility of an over pressure shooting this old stuff?
 

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My dad got a M-1 Garand in the 80's. According to what I found it is a 1941. He's never shot it and never will. It came with several crates of Lake City ammo that dates to 1940 according to the lot number. I have opened one can. It was hard to open and it made a sucking sound. Bandoliers, and 8rd clips. Card board over the tips. This stuff looks good.

So there is a possibility of an over pressure shooting this old stuff?
I would shoot that ammo all day long. The M1 was designed to shoot 150 gr. FMJ..The ammo that you mention as Lake City was made for the M1.
You will not risk bending the operating rod as it fits into the pressure curve that the M1 was designed for..a perfect match. I only use a Schuster Plug when
shooting surplus ammo form Egypt, Pakistan or other countries due to the possibility of excess pressure..not a problem with my Smith Corona 03A3
bolt action.

Dick
 

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Order from CMP, it's easy and straight forward. All measurements are included when you take delivery. No need to ask. Prices are reasonable and affordable. They now limit 8 per year (again).
 

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The only explanation I can think of, this guy thought you were a sucker who was going to pay full retail+
for his no measurement Garand. CMP is the standard for Garands. This guy got pissed off, and opened up on CMP
because he saw his big payday going down the clinker.
 

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My dad got a M-1 Garand in the 80's. According to what I found it is a 1941. He's never shot it and never will. It came with several crates of Lake City ammo that dates to 1940 according to the lot number. I have opened one can. It was hard to open and it made a sucking sound. Bandoliers, and 8rd clips. Card board over the tips. This stuff looks good.

So there is a possibility of an over pressure shooting this old stuff?
All that ammo from WW II has corrosive primers so be sure to clean your rifle accordingly or it will be ruined. Be sure to clean the gas system also.
 

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Don't be afraid of shooting 170 to 180 grain bullets in your M1 Garand... just use either 4895 or similar burning rate powder and keep the chamber and port pressure below what is the norm for commercial 30/06 ammo.

The M1 Garand was actually adopted when the M1 30 cal round was general issue. There was no M2 Ball when the design was finalized. M1 Ball used a 173-174 grain FMJ bullet at around 2,600 fps. According to General Julian Hatcher (author of two good M1 Garand books), Garand was against adopting the 150 grain M2 round as he preferred the heavier M1 round, but the National Guard asked for it so that they would not exceed the range fans of their National Guard ranges. It's interesting that the M2 round actually became a combat round, especially in the Pacific Theater.

Later Hornady loading manuals have M1 Garand specific loading date for use with not only 150 grain bullets, but also for the heavier 168 and 178 grain Sierra Match King bullets.

Later on in the M1's life, the old M1 Ball round was rejuvenated as the M72 Match round and was used extensively in the M1 for many years, particularly in match grade rifles at the National Matches.

I duplicate the M72 load by using GI cases (usually match cases, but Ball cases work fine too), CCI primers, IMR 4895 powder (Check the Hornady loading book for M1 data) and either CMP issued 173 grain bullets or commercial 168 grain match bullets.

M72 ammo: I've worn a barrel out shooting these heavy bullet loads in matches with no damage or noted wear to the rifle's oprod or action. Note the bullet weight and velocity on the back of the box.

M72 Match-Cropped.jpg View attachment 357735 View attachment 357739
 
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