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What are your tips? I have heard a drop or 2 of Locktite to the base screws, nothing on the ring screws. Also, clean receiver surface with solvent to remove all oil prior to screwing the base down. Alternately I have also heard 'oil the receiver surface real good before screwing down the bases'. What do you do?
 

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I guess I am old fashion, I never use locktite, and I oil the receiver. I just check the screws every once in a while to see if they are coming loose.
 

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Hi dan I always use a drop of blue lock tight. Their is nothing worse than to find that your mount is loose when your in the middle of nowhere. :eek:
 

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Dan, I never use loctite on threads that are in good condition when used in holes that are correct in depth. That includes those used on my .300 H&H and .375 H&H.

If however the screw displayed any wobble when threaded to half it's depth then I would consider it... if I were to use some sort of liquid thread reinforcement, I would be sure to degrease both the hole and the screw first.

HAH! I just realized that now you have THREE answers!..... :roll:
 

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I use acrylic clear finger nail polish on the base screws and ring screws. I clean up the receiver prior to mounting the bases. Make sure you clean out the mounting holes on the receiver. Sometimes the holes are loaded with gunk. Usually I just give it shot with brake cleaner. I light coat the receiver with oil and wipe it off. Keep the oil out of the mounting holes. Then screw the bases on. All you need is a small drop on the screws. The nail polish tip came from a gunsmith that I deal with. He is a top shelf gunsmith and that's what he uses. I asked about loctite his suggestion was nail polish. So that works for me. Just make sure you do not leave finger prints under the bases. The oil on your hands is acidic and over time may cause corrosion.
Good Luck
 

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I run the screws in the base one at a time and check to make sure that hole is not too shallow/screw too long {happens to me alot}. After all four screws are laid out in order, degrease the screws and holes ad half a drop of nail polish and put a very thin layer of oil on the base. After many rounds down range, none of my scopes have come loose. Not even this one, on the 7-08 barrel
 

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I like Jim have been using the clear nail polish from the "Just a buck " dollar stores for years & works great on anything that needs to be locked down tight. :cool:
 

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Do they make scopes with bi-focal lenses? I use Gorilla Glue and paste the scope directly on the barrel. Saves on rings and mounts.

No, not really. I just got tired of seeing that post about transmission fluid. :D

Okay, okay, I use clear nail polish.
 

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I also use blue Loctite on the base screws, but nothing on the ring screws. Just clean all screws with alcohol (Tequila? :lol: ), before using them. You don't need more than a small drop of Loctite. Bob
 

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I know this is a very old thread, but I thought that it might be worth it to someone to add to this. There is a guy on YouTube that goes by LoneWolfUSMC that has an excellent tutorial on mounting a scope base, scope rings and riflescope. The videos are pretty long and generally dry but the information is very useful. He gets real into the weeds on everything from bedding your scope base to different methods of ensuring your scope is level to the rifle. He also has a website at 8541 Tactical - S2 for Operational Snipers and Precision Shooters that has a non-video form of certain tutorials that are a great source on information.
 

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Here is a method that has worked very well for me. First, clean everything thoroughly. That includes the screw holes, screws, etc. Get everything clean. Don't forget the scope tube. Everything means everything. Next put a drop of Locktite on the threads of the screws and install the bases. Us a correctly fitted screw driver. Snug the screw up, but don't use good common sense and don't use so much force that you wring the screw off. Next, the bottom of the rings on the bases. Again, use common sense. Install the scope and the tops of the rings. Orient the scope to vertical before you tighten the screws down firmly. Depending on the ring set used, you may need to tweak things a bit to get the scope correctly in position relative to the bore of the rifle. Also before you tighten everything down for eternity, make very sure that you have the scope positioned for comfortable safe use when employing normal shooting positions. Given that no one normally has a bench-rest in the woods/fields, check to see that you can comfortably and safely use the rifle/scope when firing from the prone, sitting, kneeling and standing positions. You will have to compromise how your locate the scope as the ideal position for prone will not be the same as what would be ideal for sitting, kneeling or standing. It will be close. You'll figure it out.

Using the above method I've mounted scopes on rifles that have held their zero for many years. The only times I've ever had a problem is when I failed to follow this procedure. Hope this helps. Sincerely. bruce.
 

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I also use just a "dab" of blue Loctite on mounting screws for bases.
The only other thing I do different than what's been mentioned here by others, is that I use a "torque driver" on base and ring screws.
I'm one of those that is always twisting off, stripping screws.
The $40.00 for my torque driver has saved me many times that amount in aggravation alone.

base screws 30 in. lbs
windage screws 30 to 40 in. lbs
alum. rings 10 to 15 in. lbs
steel rings 15 to 20 in. lbs
wood, fiberglass,synthetic stocks w\o pillars 40 in.lbs
wood, fiberglass,synthetic stocks with pillars 65 in. lbs

Please notice these are INCH POUNDS rather than foot pounds.

Just my $.02
 
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I also use just a "dab" of blue Loctite on mounting screws for bases.
The only other thing I do different than what's been mentioned here by others, is that I use a "torque driver" on base and ring screws.
I'm one of those that is always twisting off, stripping screws.
The $40.00 for my torque driver has saved me many times that amount in aggravation alone.

base screws 30 in. lbs
windage screws 30 to 40 in. lbs
alum. rings 10 to 15 in. lbs
steel rings 15 to 20 in. lbs
wood, fiberglass,synthetic stocks w\o pillars 40 in.lbs
wood, fiberglass,synthetic stocks with pillars 65 in. lbs

Please notice these are INCH POUNDS rather than foot pounds.

Just my $.02
Universal Torque Spec. Tight, Fully Driven and Not Stripped.:D
 
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I had a pair of slugs machined out of round bar stock with the end machined to a point with 0.00" runout. After I mount the bases and lower rings , I install the slugs as I would the glass. When the points are lined up , it gives a good starting point for sighting in and reduces the chance of bending the scope out of true.
 
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