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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently got a new Victory, but haven't taken it to the range yet. After a post-assembly cleaning and lub, I noticed a warning in the owners manual stating not to dry fire - that it would damage the gun. It was a display model, and probably been dry fired many time before I bought it, the sales person even cocked it and handed it to me to show the trigger pull. My question is .......what damage would result, and do I need to worry myself before I get a chance to fire it on the range ? Any Victory owners out there that heve seen damage result ? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Recently got a new Victory, but haven't taken it to the range yet. After a post-assembly cleaning and lub, I noticed a warning in the owners manual stating not to dry fire - that it would damage the gun. It was a display model, and probably been dry fired many time before I bought it, the sales person even cocked it and handed it to me to show the trigger pull. My question is .......what damage would result, and do I need to worry myself before I get a chance to fire it on the range ? Any Victory owners out there that heve seen damage result ? Thanks
I found my answer - seems like the possibility of firing pin damage is the concern. Won't know for sure until I get to the range - which is a good excuse to go tomorrow.
 

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That is a rimfire correct? On a rimfire, dry firing it can cause the firing pin to contact the edge of the chamber and deforming it which will cause a light strike. Center fires don't have that issue.
 
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Dry fire does not seem to be an issue with Ruger rimfires. At least Ruger doesn’t frown on it. Does anyone know why. I don’t like to dryfire anything on a regular basis without snap caps or plastic wall anchors.
 
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