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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A co-worker friend of mine asked me to see what I could do to "restore" this old pistol. First off... what is it? Next, how to proceed? Navel jelly and brass scrubbing brush? WD40? Your thoughts and recommendations please.... :shock:
hvapa;p; hipnp
 

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Looks to be an Iver Johnson of some sort, maybe? Have fun with that!
 

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It's an Iver-Johnson .32 Centerfire. Probably made in the 1900-1930 time frame.

If it were mine and I needed some therapy, I would soak it in Marvel's Mystery Oil for a week or two then go after it with a brass brush. If you can get the stocks off without fracturing them, it would be a good idea.

When you're done you may have a wall hanger with something of a rough but interesting patina...

I would avoid Navel Jelly... it will strip the metal and once removed you will have a rust ball once again....

Fortunately most of the parts are readily available from Gun Parts Corp. See the schematic: http://www.e-gunparts.com/productschem. ... 20REVOLVER
 

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Also could be a Hopkins & Allen. Looks identical to a HA that I have in .38 that was great grandfathers service pc when he was a ND game warden.

Every screw etc is in the same place. Only difference I can see at all is the cylinder on mine is smaller because it is a 5 shot.

Dang, nowhere to host a pic to show the two side by side.

Larry
 

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That there is a Harrington & Richardson.

H&R made a five shot .38 and a six shot .32 on the same larger frame and I believe yours is the latter. Compare the following photos:



The target emblem on the grips is Harrington & Richardson's trademark. They also made a hammerless version of their larger frame .38 and they made smaller hammer and hammerless .32 framed breaktop revolvers. They are finely made and finished little bicycle guns that competed with S&W and Iver Johnson (Owls head trademark on the grips and a transfer bar hammer system that was way ahead of its time).

Unfortunately, I must say that in perfect and original condition the H&R's are not very collectible and their value is not very great. I sold an unfired, beautiful pair of .32 and .38 hammerless guns for just $400 for the pair a few years ago.

That poor old gun is beyond refinishing and the rust looks so bad as to be unsafe for any kind of shooting. Hop over to www.GunBroker.com and search Harrington & Richardson and maybe you can buy one for him for around $150 and then tell him you refinished it for him!
 

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Thanks Steve. I thought I was right about something for once. I was obviously mistaken :mrgreen:
 

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snafu,
Some good advice has already been offered up.
It's an 'art object' waiting to be mounted in a shadow-box.
Never particularly strong guns, the ravages of time do absolutely nothing good for metallurgy.
Hang it on the wall and enjoy the view!
Don
;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
All.. Thanks for the replies so far. Now I have a positive I.D. Here's some background, and yes it will be in a shadow box (along with some other items) and not back in the "hole" it came from. This revolver belonged to my friends wife's uncle long ago. Upon his passing her cousin gave it to her. It wasn't in the greatest shape but OK. It was stored away (almost forgotten) in their barn for many years. Apparently the barn leaks, and yes we do get occasional rain in Arizona believe it or not. Anyway, they asked me to clean it up (restore) as best as possible for a display box. The original nickel is pretty much gone. Once the crusty rust is removed and I can see what the base metal condition is like we'll proceed from there. Soon to be a "work in progress". Suggestions for rust cutting and metal treatment still very much welcome... Thanks... ya'll are great jvfmn;o
 

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snafu, if you end up following Drew's Marvel Mystery Oil approach, let us know how it ends up, I'm interested in the outcome. I have some old relics (not guns) that I'd like to try and do something with for display. BTW Marvel Mystery Oil works great as a carb/fuel injector cleaner as well as an oil additive and can be used to keep stored gasoline usable.
 

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If you don't use the Marvel Mystery Oil then you might try soaking for several days in Kroil followed by the use of a couple of brass brushes. Oil or put a thin coat of preservative grease on the exterior surfaces when you've killed all the rust and stick it in that shadowbox.
 

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toroflow said:
Quickest way to "restore" it would be to sand blast it!
NO! kubvcabo That would ruin it. njgapjgj
 

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well thats the rub, the gun pictured is "beyond" restoration, it can be covered over, dipped,painted, coated whatever after a good scrubbing but thats about it, made to "look decent"...but certainly NOT "restored"........after its "covered" in whatever form, yes, the art box ( shadow box) would be the ticket to keep it in the family and as a form of nostalgia............besides from a professional standpoint, the liability factor, would keep it out of most ,if not all shops.......... fhfjjjj
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Re: Project... restoration, advice please (update pics pt.1)

Marvel Mystery Oil soak, 1 1/2 weeks. Rub & scrub w/WD40 & brass bristle brush & brass bore brush. Some light work w/Stainless wire wheel and Dremel. Another day soak in Hoppes #9. So far so good :roll: . Any ideas on removing the remaining stubborn nickel.
 
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